Dec 28

Important Things to Consider Before Converting to a Roth IRA

Beginning in 2010, the modified Adjusted Gross Income (“AGI”) and filing status requirements for converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA are eliminated.

Below are some important points to consider when deciding whether to convert your Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC.

  • Do you have the ability to pay income taxes on the money you convert from your Traditional IRA?
  • Based on your income tax bracket, does it make sense to pay the entire tax due in 2017. If you expect your rate to go up, converting may be for you. If you think it will go down, then the opposite holds true.
  • Do you anticipate withdrawing Roth IRA funds for personal use within five years of conversion? If so, you may face taxes and penalties if you withdraw within five years of a conversion.

Converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC has a number of tax advantages and can offer you multiple tax and investments benefits.

To learn more about converting your Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, please contact one of our IRA experts at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Dec 18

In What Order Do Roth IRA Distributions Come Out of the Account

In general, you cannot pick and choose the origin of each distribution you take. For example, if you take a distribution before the five-year holding period is up, you would want to take your contributions first, because they are not subject to tax or penalties. However, the ordering rules for determining Roth distributions are quite taxpayer favorable. Roth distributions are deemed to come out in the following order:

  • Regular Roth IRA contributions are distributed first
  • Next, converted amounts, starting with the amounts first converted
  • Earnings come out last

These ordering rules can significant impact the tax treatment of the distributions. For example, if you take a distribution before the five-year holding period is up of if you fail to satisfy the other requirements of a qualified distribution, the withdrawal still won’t be subject to the early distribution tax as long as you have taken less than the total amount of all contributions you have made to your Roth IRAs. Note that for purposes of these ordering rules, all Roth IRAs are considered a single Roth IRA.

Please contact one of our Roth IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 26

Here’s What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits

Last week, the IRS announced the new limits for retirement plans for 2018.  Here’s what you need to know about your IRA Contributions –

2018 IRA (including Self-Directed IRAs) Contribution Limit – Limits remain the same as 2017.  For individuals under age 50, the limit is $5,500.  For those 50 and older, you can make an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution, bringing the total limit to $6,500.

Here's What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits2018 Deductible IRA Phase-outs – If you participate in en employer-sponsored plan (such as a 401(k) plan), there are income restrictions for a deduction.  If you are single or head-of-household, you can get a full deduction if your adjusted gross income (AGI) is $63,000 or less.  It phases out until an AGI of $73,000.  An AGI above that means you cannot deduct your IRA contribution for the year.  If you are married filing jointly, you receive a full deduction if your AGI is $101,000 or less.  This phases out until an AGI of $121,000.  If you are married filing jointly and your spouse participates in an employer’s plan, the phase-out starts at $189,000 and you are not eligible for a deduction if your AGI is above $199,000.

2018 Roth IRA (including Self-Directed Roth IRAs) Contribution Limit – Again, these are the same as last year (and the same amount as traditional plans).  $5,500 if you are under age 50 and $6,500 if you are age 50+.

2018 Roth IRA Income Limits – You may only contribute directly to a Roth IRA if you are below the income limits.  If you are single or head-of-household, you may make a full contribution if your AGI is less than $120,000.  Your contribution limit phases out until $135,000, in which you may not contribute to a Roth directly.  If you are married filing jointly, an AGI of less than $189,000 allows for a full contribution.  This amount phases out until it reaches $199,000.

Note: You must have earned income in the year(s) in which you wish to contribute to an IRA.  The amount you may contribute is the lesser of the annual limit or your earned income for the year.

SEP IRA – Contribution limit increases $1,000 to $55,000 for 2018.

SIMPLE IRA – The limit remains the same as 2017 at $12,500 with a $3,000 catch-up for those age 50 and up.

For more information about the IRA Contribution limits, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 19

Factors To Consider When Contemplating A ‘Backdoor’ Roth IRA

The following article, written by Adam Bergman, originally appeared on Forbes.com –

There have been no income level restrictions for making Roth IRA conversions since 2010, hence a high income earner can do a conversion of after-tax (non-deductible) IRA funds to a Roth IRA, which is known as a ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA. In other words, the ‘backdoor’ IRA allows a high- income earner, who has exceeded the Roth IRA annual income contribution limits, to circumvent those rules and make a Roth IRA contribution. However, as detailed below, a tax could be due on the conversion under the pro rata (aggregation) rules if the IRA holder has other traditional pre-tax IRAs that have not been taxed. In general, the taxes owed on the conversion will depend on the ratio of IRA assets that have been taxed to those that have not, making the ‘backdoor’ IRA unattractive for some.

Shutterstock

A regular contribution to a Roth IRA is generally limited to the lesser of the annual contribution limit or 100 percent of the individual’s compensation. The Roth IRA contribution limit is the same as the traditional IRA limit. For the year 2017, the annual contribution limit for an individual under the age of 50 is $5,500, and $6,500 for an individual over the age of 50.

An individual making Roth IRA contributions must reduce those contributions by the amount of any contributions made to a traditional IRA.  However, not all individual taxpayers are eligible to make Roth IRA contributions.  For taxpayer’s filing as single, one must have a modified adjusted gross income under $133,000 to contribute to a Roth IRA for the 2017 tax year, but contributions are reduced starting at $118,000.  Taxpayers filing as married, the combined modified adjusted gross income must be less than $196,000, with reductions beginning at $186,000.

Before considering a “backdoor” Roth IRA strategy, there are a number of important items to consider.  The first is the concept of the IRA pro rata aggregation rules.  Under Internal Revenue Code Section 408(d)(2), the aggregation rules hold that when an individual has multiple pre-tax IRAs, they will all be treated as one account when determining the tax consequences of any distributions (including a distribution out of the account for a Roth conversion). In other words, the aggregation rules can cause issues for individuals looking to take advantage of the ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy that have multiple IRA accounts.

For example, Amy has $100,000 of existing pre-tax IRA assets across multiple IRA accounts. Amy now makes over $200,000 so is not eligible to make a Roth IRA contribution for this year. Amy wishes to make a $5,500 Roth IRA contribution by taking advantage of the ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy, which involves making a non-deductible IRA contribution and then converting those funds into a Roth IRA.  However, since Amy has $100,000 of pre-tax IRA funds prior to the Roth IRA conversion, the aggregation rules will limit how much Amy can convert to a Roth IRA.

If Amy attempted to do a $5,500 Roth conversion (from combined IRA funds that now total $100,000 plus new $5,500 contribution equals $105,500), the return-of-after-tax portion will be only $5,500 / 105,500 = 5.2%. Which means the net result of his $5,500 Roth conversion will be $286 of after-tax funds that are converted, $5,214 of the conversion will be taxable, and she will end out with a $5,500 Roth IRA and $100,000 of pre-tax IRAs that still have $5,214 of related after-tax contributions. Hence, the net result of the IRA pro rata attribution rules is that a large portion of the after-tax funds linked with the new after-tax IRA contribution will not end up in the Roth IRA and will instead be connected with the existing pre-tax IRA funds.

Based on the example, the IRA attribution rules significantly limited the tax benefit of the ‘backdoor” Roth strategy for Amy as only a very small amount of the $5,500 after-tax funds were able to be converted tax-free to the Roth IRA. In addition, the IRA attribution rules only apply to pre-tax IRAs of the taxpayer, not his or her spouse, inherited IRAs, or any employer retirement plans (i.e. 401(k)), which can offer some interesting tax planning opportunities.

In addition to being mindful of the IRA attribution rules when considering a ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA conversion, one must also consider the step-transaction-doctrine. The step-transaction doctrine, which arose from a Supreme Court case, holds that a court can invalidate a transaction if the separate steps involved in the transaction have no independent substantial business purpose. In the context of the ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy, the thinking goes that if the separate steps of the non-deductible IRA contribution and subsequent Roth conversion are done too quickly or simultaneously there is some risk the IRS could attempt to invoke the step-transaction doctrine in order to invalidate the Roth conversion.

There is no court precedent for this position, but many tax experts believe it would be wise to wait some time in between the nondeductible IRA contribution and the subsequent Roth conversion. There is also no firm rule for how long one should wait after the nondeductible contribution is made before making the Roth IRA conversion, but waiting a few months and having the IRA funds invested during the waiting period is thought to be sufficient.

Since 2010, the ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy has been viewed as an attractive way for many high income earners to take advantage of the power of the Roth IRA.  Below are some tips to consider before doing a ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA:

  • Understand the Roth IRA contribution income limits for the taxable year in question
  • Determine whether you have any existing pre-tax IRA funds. If so, understanding the IRA attribution rules under Internal Revenue Code Section 408(d) is crucial
  • Are you currently participating in an employer retirement plan? If so, rolling over existing pre-tax IRA funds to an employer plan may help you circumvent the IRA attribution rules.
  • Be mindful of the step-transaction doctrine and consider waiting at least several months between the non-deductible contribution and the Roth IRA conversion
  • Consider not documenting that you are doing a ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy.

It is unclear how long the ‘backdoor’ Roth IRA strategy will continue to be permitted. President Obama’s 2016 budget recommendations did attempt to end it, but the recommendation did not become law.  It is unclear what the Trump Administration’s position is with respect to it.  However, for now, the ‘backdoor’ IRA strategy continues to be a very popular way for high income earners to make Roth IRA contributions.

For more information about the ‘Backdoor’ Roth IRA, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Aug 14

How to Convert an IRA to a Roth and the Advantages

Beginning in 2010, the modified Adjusted Gross Income (“AGI”) and filing status requirements for converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA are eliminated.

Below are some important points to consider when deciding whether to convert your Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC.

  • Do you have the ability to pay income taxes on the money you convert from your Traditional IRA?
  • Based on your income tax bracket, does it make sense to pay the entire tax due in 2017. If you expect your rate to go up, converting may be for you. If you think it will go down, then the opposite holds true.
  • Do you anticipate withdrawing Roth IRA funds for personal use within five years of conversion? If so, you may face taxes and penalties if you withdraw within five years of a conversion.

The main advantage of a Roth IRA over a Traditional IRA is that if you qualify to make contributions, all distributions from the IRA are tax-free. Furthermore, unlike traditional IRAs, you may contribute to a Roth IRA for as long as you continue to have earned income (for a traditional IRA – you can’t make any contributions after you reach age 70 1/2).

Self-Directed Traditional IRA

Self-Directed Roth IRA

Tax deductible contributions

Contributions are not tax deductible – contributions made to a Roth IRA are from after tax dollars

Distributions may be taken by age 59 1/2 and are mandatory by 70 1/2.

No Mandatory Distribution Age – with a Roth IRA you are not required to ever take distributions

Taxes are paid on amount of distributions (10% excise tax may apply if withdrawn prior to age 591/2)

No taxes on distributions if rules and regulations are followed

Available to everyone; no income restrictions

  • Single filers, Head of Household or Married Filing Separately (and you did not live with your spouse during the year) with modified adjusted gross income up to $118,000 can make a full contribution.  Contributions are phased-out starting at $118,000 and you cannot make a contribution if your adjusted gross income is in excess of $133,000.
  • Joint filers with modified adjusted gross income up to $186,000 can make a full contribution.  Once again, this contribution is phased-out starting at $186,000 and you cannot make a contribution if your adjusted gross income is in excess of $196,000.

Funds can be used to purchase a variety of investments (stocks, real estate, precious metals, notes, etc.)

Funds can be used to purchase a variety of investments (stocks, real estate, precious metals, notes, etc.)

IRA investments grow tax-free until distribution (tax deferral)

All earnings and principal are 100% tax free if rules and regulations are followed – No tax on distributions so maximum tax-deferral

Income/gains from IRA investments are tax-free

Income/gains from IRA investments are tax-free

Purchasing a real estate property and taking possession of the property after 59 1/2 would be subject to tax

Purchasing a domestic or foreign real estate property then taking possession after 59 1/2 would be tax-free

To learn more about the advantages of converting a Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC please contact one of our IRA experts at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jul 05

What Are the Rules for Rolling Over a Roth IRA?

The contribution limitation does not apply to a “qualified rollover contribution,” but no rollover contribution other than a qualified rollover contribution is permitted. The term “qualified rollover contribution” includes only the following:

  • A rollover contribution from another Roth IRA.
  • A rollover contribution from a traditional IRA that satisfies the requirements for a rollover from one traditional IRA to another.
  • A rollover contribution from a qualified pension, profit-sharing, stock bonus, or annuity plan (qualified plan), tax-deferred annuity, or eligible deferred compensation plan that satisfies the requirements for rollovers from the particular type of plan.
  • A contribution to a Roth IRA by an individual who has received a military death gratuity.

A qualified rollover must satisfy all of the requirements for rollovers of and into IRAs generally, which means, for example, that a rollover contribution must made within 60 days of the rolled-over distribution and the rollover privilege is denied to beneficiaries of IRA owners (other than surviving spouses). For years beginning before 2010, an individual may not make a qualified rollover from a traditional IRA, qualified plan, tax-deferred annuity, or eligible deferred compensation plan to a Roth IRA for his or her benefit if his or her adjusted gross income for the year exceeds $100,000.

Please contact one of our Roth IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jun 16

How Does a Roth IRA Contribution Work?

Assume individual Jane decides to set aside $1,000 of her pretax income for an IRA contribution. She could contribute the entire $1,000 to a traditional IRA because the deduction for the contribution would effectively eliminate any current tax on the $1,000. Since a contribution to a Roth IRA is not deductible, she could contribute to a Roth IRA only the amount remaining after paying tax on the $1,000. Assume T is, at all times, taxed at a flat 30 percent. She could therefore make a Roth IRA contribution of $700 ($1,000 less 30 percent thereof).

For 2017, the maximum you can contribute to a Roth IRA is $5,500, or $6,500 if you are age 50 or older.

How Does a Roth IRA Contribution Work?

Please contact one of our Roth IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

May 01

Taking Advantage of the Stretch Feature of a Self-Directed Roth IRA

In addition to the significant tax benefits in using a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC to make investments, the Roth IRA also offers a number of very exciting estate planning opportunities.

In general, a self-directed Roth IRA is an after-tax account that allows the Roth IRA holder to benefit from tax-free investment growth, so long as a Roth IRA distribution is not taken prior to a five year holding period and the Roth IRA holder is not under the age of 59½ ( a “qualified distribution”). In addition, a Roth IRA holder would not be subject to the required minimum distribution rules (“RMD”).

Taking Advantage of the Stretch Feature of a Self-Directed Roth IRAWith IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Estate Planning Solution, your family could receive tax-free use of your Roth IRA funds. Converting a pre-tax IRA to a Roth IRA could be used as a very valuable estate-planning tool for estate owner’s that would be subject to the estate tax (For 2017 – estates over $5,490,000) as the Roth conversion funds would be paid out of funds subject to estate tax.

Estate Tax Basics

In general, an IRA, whether a traditional or a Roth, is included in the owner’s gross estate. You can’t avoid that. But when a traditional IRA is inherited, the beneficiary must include all distributions in gross income just as the original owner would have. The distributions are taxed at the beneficiary’s ordinary income tax rate. The beneficiary is able to stretch out the distributions over his or her life expectancy, but annual distributions are required and will be taxed. Hence, when passing a Traditional IRA to a spouse or child, the beneficiary is required to pay ordinary income tax on the IRA distribution amount, which would reduce the amount of Traditional IRA funds available to spend.

Converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA – Estate Planning Benefits

In a conversion of a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, the IRA converted amount is as though it were taken as a distribution. So, hence, you would be subject to ordinary income taxes on the converted amount. Note: there is no restriction on the amount of IRA funds that can be converted at one time.

The first estate tax benefit of a Roth IRA conversion is that the Roth IRA holder’s estate would be reduced by the income taxes paid on the amount of the Roth IRA conversion. There are several estate planning benefits to paying tax on the Roth conversion while you are alive.

  • Turning Taxable Distributions into Tax-Free Distributions: Doing a Roth IRA conversion is in effect paying the taxes on the IRA funds for your heirs. They would have owed the taxes in the future when they were required to take a distribution from the inherited IRA. Instead, the Roth IRA holder would be paying the tax now, out of his/her taxable estate, and avoid estate and gift taxes on that amount. Thereafter, when your beneficiary would take a distribution from the inherited Roth IRA, those Roth IRA distributions would be tax-free.
  • Pay Tax & Reduce Estate Taxes: Paying the taxes now reduces the size of your estate and any estate tax bill. This isn’t a factor for estates below the taxable level, but it could be important for taxable estates.
  • Lifetime of Tax Benefits: A Roth IRA conversion can provide lifetime income tax benefits to the Roth IRA holder and it can also benefit your beneficiaries. When you maintain a traditional IRA, after age 70½ you’re required to take minimum annual distributions, which would be subject to income tax. If it turned out that you didn’t need this money for spending or living purposes, it simply increases the taxes you would be required to pay. In addition, being required to take a Traditional IRA distribution could increase your income enough to push you into a higher tax bracket, reduce itemized deductions, increase taxes on Social Security benefits, and have other effects. The older you become, the higher the required distributions and taxes become. With a Roth IRA, you or your beneficiaries could benefit from tax-free appreciation of the Roth IRA assets as well as generating tax-free income to live off.
  • Tax-Free Growth & Tax-Free Income: Once the Traditional IRA has been converted to a Roth IRA, the Roth IRA holder and his or her beneficiaries would be able to benefit from tax-free growth and income generated by the Roth IRA. In other words, the assets of the Roth IRA will be able to grow tax-free and all “qualified distributions” from the Roth IRA would be tax-free allowing the Roth IRA holder or his or her beneficiaries to live off the Roth IRA funds without ever having to pay tax on the income.
  • Take Advantage of Historical Low Tax Rates: Even though a lot has been made of the increasing Obamacare tax rates, our current income tax rates are still at historical lows. Therefore, it is conceivable that income tax rates will rise in the future especially with the high levels of debt that is being used by the Government to stimulate the economy. Doing a Roth IRA conversion now versus later could potentially be a tax savvy decision if the Roth IRA grows at a respectful rate and if tax rates increase. Having a Roth IRA to use or offer to your beneficiaries in a high tax environment will prove to be extremely tax beneficial.

The Self-Directed Roth Stretch IRA

Unlike the original Roth IRA owner, a non-spousal beneficiary of a Roth IRA is required to take minimum distributions over his or her life expectancy. Note: a spousal beneficiary of a Roth IRA is not required to take a Roth IRA distribution.

In the case of a non-spousal Roth IRA beneficiary, when the beneficiary is relatively young, there is the potential for the distributions to be less than the annual earnings of the Roth IRA, so the Roth IRA grows while the distributions are being taken. Of course, the beneficiary can take more than the minimum, even the entire Roth IRA, at any time tax-free. In other words, using a Self-Directed Roth Stretch IRA will allow an individual to transfer tax-free assets to children or other beneficiaries and allow those individuals to benefit from tax-free income while the Roth IRA contributes to grow tax-free.

To learn more about the estate tax benefits of having a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Apr 23

Retirement And Educational Savings Tax Planning Tips To Lower Taxes In 2017

Here’s another article written by Adam Bergman for Forbes.com

Now that the tax filing deadline has passed for the 2016 tax year, this is a perfect time to start thinking about some simple ways to boost retirement savings and at the same time lower overall tax liability for 2017.

Start Thinking IRA: For 2017, the maximum IRA contribution is $5,500, or $6,500 if you are over the age of fifty. Contributions can generally be made in pre-tax, after-tax, or Roth.  A pre-tax IRA, also known as a traditional IRA, is one of the more popular ways to save for retirement that also offers tax advantages. Contributions made to a traditional IRA may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your circumstances, and, generally, amounts in a traditional IRA (including earnings and gains) are not taxed until distributed, which is not required until one reaches the age of 70 1/2.

Retirement And Educational Savings Tax Planning Tips To Lower Taxes In 2017An after-tax IRA, also known as a non-deductible IRA, is a traditional IRA that contains nondeductible contributions. Nondeductible contributions to traditional IRAs often occur when one makes too much to make a deductible contribution, or is limited because of employer 401(k) plan contributions. When one takes a distribution from an after-tax IRA, the portion of the distribution coming from nondeductible contributions is tax-free, although, any income and earnings generated from that after-tax contribution would be subject to tax, and a 10% early distribution penalty if the individual is under the age of 59 1/2.

A Roth IRA is an improved version of the after-tax nondeductible IRA.  Although one does not benefit from a tax deduction for contributions, all of the qualified distributions, including earnings, come out tax-free. To contribute to a Roth IRA, ones modified adjusted gross income must fall below the annual limits for your filing status (which is $196,000 if filing jointly for 2017). One can withdraw contributions any time, but must be 59 1/2 years old and you must have had a Roth IRA open for at least five tax years before one can withdraw income and gains without tax or penalty.

Business Owners Rejoice:  Owning a business in 2017 can have some significant retirement tax benefits, if one is aware of them. The scope of the benefits is somewhat dependent on whether the business has full-time employees other than the owners.  For example, a sole proprietor or a business entity with no full-time employees, may be eligible to contribute up to $54,000 ($60,000 if the participant is over the age of fifty), to a solo 401(k) plan in pre-tax, after-tax or Roth.  Whereas, if the business has non-owner full-time employees, the business owner’s total contribution may be limited due to the cost of offering maximum employer profit sharing contributions to all employees.  Nevertheless, business owners should consult with their tax advisor to examine how establishing an employer retirement plan, such as a 401(k) plan, SEP or SIMPLE IRA for their business could potentially help their retirement savings, as well as reduce their annual tax liability.

Get to Know the 529 Plan.  A 529 Plan is an education savings plan operated by a state or educational institution designed to help families set aside funds for future college costs. It is named after Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. Nearly every state now has at least one 529 plan available, but the plan characteristics may differ by state.   529 plans are usually categorized as either prepaid or savings plans. In general, the tax advantages of establishing and funding a 529 plan is that earnings are not subject to federal tax and generally not subject to state tax when used for the qualified education expenses of the designated beneficiary, such as tuition, fees, books, as well as room and board. Contributions to a 529 plan, however, are not deductible. One may make a contribution of $14,000 a year or less to a 529 plan qualifies for the annual federal gift tax exclusion. Under special rules unique to 529 plans, one can gift a lump sum of up to $70,000 ($140,000 for joint gifts) and avoid federal gift tax, provided one makes an election to spread the gift evenly over five years Thus, establishing and funding a 529 plan may will not offer you an immediate tax deduction, but it will allow you to help your children afford college by having the contributions and earnings grow without tax over time, thereby, potentially allowing one to spend their retirement savings on other expenses.

HSA Triple Tax Benefit: IRC Section 223 allows individuals who are covered by a compatible health plan, often referred to as a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP), to set aside funds on a tax-free basis up to the contribution limit to pay for certain out-of-pocket medical expenses. Health Savings Accounts have a triple tax benefit—funds go into the account tax-free, funds grow tax-free and remain completely tax-free when used for eligible medical expenses.  The IRS imposes certain requirements in order to be eligible to contribute to an HSA, such as one cannot be covered by Medicare.  The maximum 2017 contribution is $6750 for families, with a $1000 catch-up for individuals over the age of fifty-five.

Planning and saving for retirement does not have to be painful.  Understanding the rules and employing a consistent approach can help increase retirement savings while simultaneously reducing ones tax liability. However, a few simple retirement planning moves can help make the difference when April 17, 2018 rolls around.

For more information, please contact an IRA Expert @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Mar 30

Do You Have to File a Form with the IRS if You Received Distributions from Your Roth IRA?

Yes. In general, File Form 8606 if you received distributions from a Roth IRA.
Use Form 8606, Nondeductible IRAs, to report:

Do You Have to File a Form with the IRS if You Received Distributions from Your Roth IRA?

  • Nondeductible contributions you made to traditional IRAs,
  • Distributions from traditional, SEP, or SIMPLE IRAs, if you have ever made nondeductible contributions to traditional IRAs,
  • Distributions from Roth IRAs, and
  • Conversions from traditional, SEP, or SIMPLE IRAs to Roth IRAs.

Please contact one of our Roth IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page