Dec 04

Tax Efficiency is Most Popular Reason for Investors Establishing a Self-Directed IRA to Purchase Cryptocurrencies

Opportunity to generate tax-free income and gains from cryptocurrency investments most popular reason behind using a self-directed Roth IRA to make investment

IRA Financial Group, the leading provider of self-directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) Plan announces the finding of its internal report which concluded that tax efficiency was the primary reason behind investors using a self-directed IRA or Roth IRA to purchase cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoins. “The primary advantage of using a self-directed IRA LLC to make Bitcoin investments is that all income and gains associated with the IRA investment grow tax-deferred or tax-free in the case of a Roth IRA,” stated Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

IRA Financial Group & IRA Financial Trust Company has partnered to offer a Bitcoin IRA LLC platform for cryptocurrency investors. The self-directed IRA LLC is an IRS approved structure that allows one to use their retirement funds to make Bitcoin and other investments tax-free and without custodian consent.

Tax Efficiency is Most Popular Reason for Investors Establishing a Self-Directed IRA to Purchase CryptocurrenciesIRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed retirement plans, including the Bitcoin IRA and cryptocurrency self-directed IRA. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

The IRA Financial Trust Company, a self-directed IRA custodian, was founded by Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group.

Adam Bergman, IRA Financial Group partner, has written six books the topic of self-directed retirement plans, including, “The Checkbook IRA”, “Going Solo,” Turning Retirement Funds into Start-Up Dreams, Solo 401(k) Plan in a Nutshell, Self-Directed IRA in a Nutshell, and in God We Trust in Roth We Prosper.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646.

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Nov 20

Maximum Contributions for Your Self Directed IRA and Roth IRA

The maximum contribution limit for a self-directed IRA for 2017 is $5,500 or $6,500 if you’re age 50 or older, or your taxable compensation for the year, if less. Contributions to a self-directed Roth IRA may be limited based on your filing status and income.

Contributions made to a self-directed IRA LLC must be made to the IRA administrator/custodian and may not be contributed directly to the LLC. Once the IRA contribution is made to the IRA administrator/custodian, the funds can then be transferred to the IRA LLC.

Is my IRA contribution deductible on my tax return?

If neither you nor your spouse is covered by an employer retirement plan, such as a 401(k), your deduction is allowed in full.

For contributions to a traditional IRA, the amount you can deduct may be limited if you or your spouse is covered by a retirement plan at work and your income exceeds certain levels. In the case of a Roth IRA, contributions aren’t deductible.

Maximum Contributions for Your Self Directed IRA and Roth IRACan I contribute to a traditional or Roth Self-Directed IRA if I’m covered by a retirement plan at work?

Yes, you can contribute to a traditional and/or Roth self-directed IRA even if you participate in an employer-sponsored retirement plan (including a SEP or SIMPLE IRA plan). If you or your spouse is covered by an employer-sponsored retirement plan, such as a 401(k) plan and your income exceeds certain levels, you may not be able to deduct your entire contribution.

Can I establish a self-directed IRA if only one spouse has earned income for the year?

Yes. If you file a joint return, you and your spouse can each make IRA contributions even if only one of you has taxable compensation. The amount of your combined contributions can’t be more than the taxable compensation reported on your joint return and cannot exceed the maximum IRA contributions for the year (for 2017 $5500 or $6500 if over the age of 50). It doesn’t matter which spouse earned the compensation.

How can I make a Roth IRA contribution if I earned too much money in 2017?

For 2017, if your modified adjusted gross income is below $181,000 and you file a joint return, you can make a Roth IRA contribution. For those who earned greater than $181,000 during the year, the IRS provides a formula, which will set forth the reduced maximum amount of Roth IRA contributions permitted for the year, if any.

One way to circumvent the Roth IRA income threshold rules, if to simply make an after-tax traditional IRA contribution and then convert the Traditional IRA into a Roth IRA. Since the Traditional IRA contribution was made after-tax there would be no tax on the Roth IRA conversion. This tactic was made possible when the IRS removed the income level restrictions for making Roth conversions in 2010.

Can I Make IRA contributions after age 70½

You can’t make regular contributions to a traditional IRA in the year you reach 70½ and older. However, you can still contribute to a Roth IRA and make rollover contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA regardless of your age.

To learn more about the self-directed IRA and self-directed Roth IRA contribution rules, please contact a self-directed IRA tax expert at 800-472-0646.

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Nov 16

The Secret to the Self-Directed Roth IRA

In 1997, Congress introduced the Roth IRA to be like a traditional IRA, but with a few attractive modifications. The big advantage of a Roth IRA is that if you qualify to make contributions, all distributions from the Roth IRA are tax-free – even the investment returns – as long as the distributions meet certain requirements. In addition, unlike traditional IRAs, you may contribute to a Roth IRA for as long as you continue to have earned income (in the case of a traditional IRA, you can’t make contributions after you reach age 701/2).

NEW RULES FOR CONVERSIONS FROM IRAS TO ROTH IRAS

For tax years starting in 2011, the $100,000 modified adjusted gross income limit for conversations to Roth IRA is eliminated and married taxpayers filing a separate return can now convert amounts to a Roth IRA.

The Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Secret

Alternative investments such as real estate have always been permitted in IRAs, but few people seemed to know about this option- until the last several years. This is because large financial institutions have little incentive to recommend something other than stocks, bonds or mutual funds which bring in extremely profitable commissions and fees for them.

The Secret to the Self-Directed Roth IRAThere are approximately 2.5 million Self-Directed IRA accounts in the United States, a large portion of which are Roth IRA accounts. In the last several years, the number of Self-Directed IRA LLC accounts has grown significantly. The significant increase in the number of Self-Directed IRAs formed can be largely attributed due to the poor performance of the stock market, the growth of the real estate market, the lack of liquidity in the small business loan market, and the increase in media coverage by the Wall Street Journal, CNBC, The New York Times, Business Week, and some of the other major financial media companies.

It is not entirely uncommon for a tax or financial advisor to have not heard of self-directed IRAs given the fact that the traditional financial institutions have concealed their benefits due to their focus on selling the more profitable equities, bonds, and mutual funds.

The Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Solution

The Self-Directed IRA LLC structure was affirmed in the Tax Court case Swanson v. Commissioner, 106 T.C. 76 (1996), and further confirmed by the IRS in Field Service Advisory (FSA) 200128011 (April 6, 2001).

A Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC offers one the ability to use his or her retirement funds to make almost any type of investment on their own without requiring the consent of any custodian or person. Tired of being forced to invest in stocks or mutual funds? Have an investment opportunity, such as real estate or a business investment that you would love to make with your Roth IRA funds? Then the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC is your solution. In addition to the tremendous Roth IRA benefits (tax-free profits, tax deductions, asset protection and estate planning), the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC allows you to invest tax-free in investments that you know and understand. Aside from life insurance, collectibles and certain “prohibited transaction” investments outlined in Internal Revenue Code Section 4975, a Self-Directed IRA can invest in most commonly made investments, including real estate, private business entities, public stocks, private stocks, and commercial paper.

The self-directed Roth IRA LLC, similar to a Self-Directed IRA LLC, allows the IRA holder to:

  • Use the same Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC to purchase domestic and foreign real estate, private mortgages, gold and stocks, bonds and mutual funds inside the same plan and generate profits tax-free.
  • Purchase real estate foreclosures and tax liens on the spot, or make personal loans by simply writing a check and generate profits tax-free.
  • Buy your retirement home now at today’s prices, rent it out, and then move in tax-free at the age of 59 1/2!
  • Buy a vacation home now at today’s prices anywhere in the world, rent it out, and then use it tax-free at the age of 59 1/2!
  • Buy an office building now at today’s prices, rent it out, and then move your business in tax-free at the age of 59 1/2.

The IRA Financial Group will take care of the entire setup of your Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 7-21 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the state of formation and the custodian holding your retirement funds. Our IRA experts and tax and ERISA professionals are onsite greatly reducing the setup time and cost. Most importantly, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned a retirement tax professional to help with the establishment of the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

To learn more about the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC structure, contact one of our IRA Professionals at 800-IRA-0646 today!

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Oct 26

Here’s What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits

Last week, the IRS announced the new limits for retirement plans for 2018.  Here’s what you need to know about your IRA Contributions –

2018 IRA (including Self-Directed IRAs) Contribution Limit – Limits remain the same as 2017.  For individuals under age 50, the limit is $5,500.  For those 50 and older, you can make an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution, bringing the total limit to $6,500.

Here's What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits2018 Deductible IRA Phase-outs – If you participate in en employer-sponsored plan (such as a 401(k) plan), there are income restrictions for a deduction.  If you are single or head-of-household, you can get a full deduction if your adjusted gross income (AGI) is $63,000 or less.  It phases out until an AGI of $73,000.  An AGI above that means you cannot deduct your IRA contribution for the year.  If you are married filing jointly, you receive a full deduction if your AGI is $101,000 or less.  This phases out until an AGI of $121,000.  If you are married filing jointly and your spouse participates in an employer’s plan, the phase-out starts at $189,000 and you are not eligible for a deduction if your AGI is above $199,000.

2018 Roth IRA (including Self-Directed Roth IRAs) Contribution Limit – Again, these are the same as last year (and the same amount as traditional plans).  $5,500 if you are under age 50 and $6,500 if you are age 50+.

2018 Roth IRA Income Limits – You may only contribute directly to a Roth IRA if you are below the income limits.  If you are single or head-of-household, you may make a full contribution if your AGI is less than $120,000.  Your contribution limit phases out until $135,000, in which you may not contribute to a Roth directly.  If you are married filing jointly, an AGI of less than $189,000 allows for a full contribution.  This amount phases out until it reaches $199,000.

Note: You must have earned income in the year(s) in which you wish to contribute to an IRA.  The amount you may contribute is the lesser of the annual limit or your earned income for the year.

SEP IRA – Contribution limit increases $1,000 to $55,000 for 2018.

SIMPLE IRA – The limit remains the same as 2017 at $12,500 with a $3,000 catch-up for those age 50 and up.

For more information about the IRA Contribution limits, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

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Sep 11

Taking Advantage of a Self-Directed Roth IRA When Planning Your Estate

In addition to the significant tax benefits in using a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC to make investments, the Roth IRA also offers a number of very exciting estate planning opportunities.

In general, a self-directed Roth IRA is an after-tax account that allows the Roth IRA holder to benefit from tax-free investment growth, so long as a Roth IRA distribution is not taken prior to a five year holding period and the Roth IRA holder is not under the age of 59½ ( a “qualified distribution”). In addition, a Roth IRA holder would not be subject to the required minimum distribution rules (“RMD”).

With IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Estate Planning Solution, your family could receive tax-free use of your Roth IRA funds. Converting a pre-tax IRA to a Roth IRA could be used as a very valuable estate-planning tool for estate owner’s that would be subject to the estate tax (For 2015 – estates over $5,430,000) as the Roth conversion funds would be paid out of funds subject to estate tax.

Estate Tax Basics

In general, an IRA, whether a traditional or a Roth, is included in the owner’s gross estate. You can’t avoid that. But when a traditional IRA is inherited, the beneficiary must include all distributions in gross income just as the original owner would have. The distributions are taxed at the beneficiary’s ordinary income tax rate. The beneficiary is able to stretch out the distributions over his or her life expectancy, but annual distributions are required and will be taxed. Hence, when passing a Traditional IRA to a spouse or child, the beneficiary is required to pay ordinary income tax on the IRA distribution amount, which would reduce the amount of Traditional IRA funds available to spend.

Converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA – Estate Planning Benefits

In a conversion of a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA, the IRA converted amount is as though it were taken as a distribution. So, hence, you would be subject to ordinary income taxes on the converted amount. Note: there is no restriction on the amount of IRA funds that can be converted at one time.

The first estate tax benefit of a Roth IRA conversion is that the Roth IRA holder’s estate would be reduced by the income taxes paid on the amount of the Roth IRA conversion. There are several estate planning benefits to paying tax on the Roth conversion while you are alive.

  • Turning Taxable Distributions into Tax-Free Distributions: Doing a Roth IRA conversion is in effect paying the taxes on the IRA funds for your heirs. They would have owed the taxes in the future when they were required to take a distribution from the inherited IRA. Instead, the Roth IRA holder would be paying the tax now, out of his/her taxable estate, and avoid estate and gift taxes on that amount. Thereafter, when your beneficiary would take a distribution from the inherited Roth IRA, those Roth IRA distributions would be tax-free.
  • Pay Tax & Reduce Estate Taxes: Paying the taxes now reduces the size of your estate and any estate tax bill. This isn’t a factor for estates below the taxable level, but it could be important for taxable estates.
  • Lifetime of Tax Benefits: A Roth IRA conversion can provide lifetime income tax benefits to the Roth IRA holder and it can also benefit your beneficiaries. When you maintain a traditional IRA, after age 70½ you’re required to take minimum annual distributions, which would be subject to income tax. If it turned out that you didn’t need this money for spending or living purposes, it simply increases the taxes you would be required to pay. In addition, being required to take a Traditional IRA distribution could increase your income enough to push you into a higher tax bracket, reduce itemized deductions, increase taxes on Social Security benefits, and have other effects. The older you become, the higher the required distributions and taxes become. With a Roth IRA, you or your beneficiaries could benefit from tax-free appreciation of the Roth IRA assets as well as generating tax-free income to live off.
  • Tax-Free Growth & Tax-Free Income: Once the Traditional IRA has been converted to a Roth IRA, the Roth IRA holder and his or her beneficiaries would be able to benefit from tax-free growth and income generated by the Roth IRA. In other words, the assets of the Roth IRA will be able to grow tax-free and all “qualified distributions” from the Roth IRA would be tax-free allowing the Roth IRA holder or his or her beneficiaries to live off the Roth IRA funds without ever having to pay tax on the income.
  • Take Advantage of Historical Low Tax Rates: Even though a lot has been made of the increasing Obamacare tax rates, our current income tax rates are still at historical lows. Therefore, it is conceivable that income tax rates will rise in the future especially with the high levels of debt that is being used by the Government to stimulate the economy. Doing a Roth IRA conversion now versus later could potentially be a tax savvy decision if the Roth IRA grows at a respectful rate and if tax rates increase. Having a Roth IRA to use or offer to your beneficiaries in a high tax environment will prove to be extremely tax beneficial.

The Self-Directed Roth Stretch IRA

Unlike the original Roth IRA owner, a non-spousal beneficiary of a Roth IRA is required to take minimum distributions over his or her life expectancy. Note: a spousal beneficiary of a Roth IRA is not required to take a Roth IRA distribution.

In the case of a non-spousal Roth IRA beneficiary, when the beneficiary is relatively young, there is the potential for the distributions to be less than the annual earnings of the Roth IRA, so the Roth IRA grows while the distributions are being taken. Of course, the beneficiary can take more than the minimum, even the entire Roth IRA, at any time tax-free. In other words, using a Self-Directed Roth Stretch IRA will allow an individual to transfer tax-free assets to children or other beneficiaries and allow those individuals to benefit from tax-free income while the Roth IRA contributes to grow tax-free.

To learn more about the estate tax benefits of having a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

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Aug 14

How to Convert an IRA to a Roth and the Advantages

Beginning in 2010, the modified Adjusted Gross Income (“AGI”) and filing status requirements for converting a Traditional IRA to a Roth IRA are eliminated.

Below are some important points to consider when deciding whether to convert your Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC.

  • Do you have the ability to pay income taxes on the money you convert from your Traditional IRA?
  • Based on your income tax bracket, does it make sense to pay the entire tax due in 2017. If you expect your rate to go up, converting may be for you. If you think it will go down, then the opposite holds true.
  • Do you anticipate withdrawing Roth IRA funds for personal use within five years of conversion? If so, you may face taxes and penalties if you withdraw within five years of a conversion.

The main advantage of a Roth IRA over a Traditional IRA is that if you qualify to make contributions, all distributions from the IRA are tax-free. Furthermore, unlike traditional IRAs, you may contribute to a Roth IRA for as long as you continue to have earned income (for a traditional IRA – you can’t make any contributions after you reach age 70 1/2).

Self-Directed Traditional IRA

Self-Directed Roth IRA

Tax deductible contributions

Contributions are not tax deductible – contributions made to a Roth IRA are from after tax dollars

Distributions may be taken by age 59 1/2 and are mandatory by 70 1/2.

No Mandatory Distribution Age – with a Roth IRA you are not required to ever take distributions

Taxes are paid on amount of distributions (10% excise tax may apply if withdrawn prior to age 591/2)

No taxes on distributions if rules and regulations are followed

Available to everyone; no income restrictions

  • Single filers, Head of Household or Married Filing Separately (and you did not live with your spouse during the year) with modified adjusted gross income up to $118,000 can make a full contribution.  Contributions are phased-out starting at $118,000 and you cannot make a contribution if your adjusted gross income is in excess of $133,000.
  • Joint filers with modified adjusted gross income up to $186,000 can make a full contribution.  Once again, this contribution is phased-out starting at $186,000 and you cannot make a contribution if your adjusted gross income is in excess of $196,000.

Funds can be used to purchase a variety of investments (stocks, real estate, precious metals, notes, etc.)

Funds can be used to purchase a variety of investments (stocks, real estate, precious metals, notes, etc.)

IRA investments grow tax-free until distribution (tax deferral)

All earnings and principal are 100% tax free if rules and regulations are followed – No tax on distributions so maximum tax-deferral

Income/gains from IRA investments are tax-free

Income/gains from IRA investments are tax-free

Purchasing a real estate property and taking possession of the property after 59 1/2 would be subject to tax

Purchasing a domestic or foreign real estate property then taking possession after 59 1/2 would be tax-free

To learn more about the advantages of converting a Traditional IRA to a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC please contact one of our IRA experts at 800-472-0646.

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Jul 24

Can You Invest in Options with a Self-Directed Roth IRA?

When it comes to making investments with a self-directed Roth IRA LLC, the IRS generally does not tell you what you can invest in, only what you cannot invest in.  The types of investments that are not permitted to be made using retirement funds is outlined in Internal Revenue Code Section 408 and 4975.  These rules are generally known as the “Prohibited Transaction” rules.

In addition, to the Prohibited Transaction rules, the IRS imposes a levy or tax on certain transactions involving IRA funds.  In general, when one uses IRA funds to invest in an active business, such as a restaurant, store, factory that is operated through a passthrough entity such as a Limited Liability Company or Partnership or used nonrecourse financing, such as a nonrecourse loan or margin in a stock or trading account, a percentage of net profits or income generated by that activity could be subject to a tax. The tax imposed is often referred to as Unrelated Business Taxable Income or UBIT or UBTI.  The UBTI rules are generally outlined in Internal Revenue Code Sections 512-514.

Using a Self Directed Roth IRA to Invest in OptionsThe reason the UBTI tax rules do not impact most retirement investors, is that Internal Revenue Code Section 512(b) provides a general exemption for the following categories of income generated by a retirement account:  dividends, interest, royalties, rental income, and capital gain type transaction, As a result, since the majority of retirement investors purchase publicly traded company stock, which is exempted from the UBTI tax pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 512, the UBTI tax rules are not widely known.

When it comes to investing in options with a self-directed Roth IRA LLC, the question then becomes whether the investment would trigger the UBTI rules. An option is a contract that gives the buyer the right, but not the obligation, to buy or sell an underlying asset at a specific price on or before a certain date. An option, just like a stock or bond, is a security. It is also a binding contract with strictly defined terms and properties.

According to the IRS , any gain from the lapse or termination of options to buy or sell securities is excluded from unrelated business taxable income. Note – the exclusion is not available if the organization is engaged in the trade or business of writing options or the options are held by the organization as inventory or for sale to customers in the ordinary course of a trade or business. Hence, if option trading is not being done as an active trade or business, then using a self-directed Roth IRA LLC to invest in options would not trigger the UBTI tax rules.

For more information on using a self-directed Roth IRA LLC to invest in options, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

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Jun 13

Tax Treatment Of Cryptocurrencies Creating Opportunities For IRA Investors

For a growing number of investors, cryptocurrency is not only the future of money, but also an attractive and potentially profitable investment asset, though highly risky and volatile.  Bitcoin has become the public’s most visible and popular cryptocurrency and it is also among the oldest, having first emerged in 2009.  Over one year, the market capitalization for bitcoin has increased enormously, from around $7.16 billion in May 2016 to $27.9 billion today.  As the price of bitcoin has risen over the last year or so, so has the confidence among investors, including retirement account investors.

The process of buying cryptocurrency is still somewhat unclear for a lot of people. It’s not a stock or a traditional investment.  For most people in the U.S., Coinbase would be the easiest option to buy cryptocurrency, such as bitcoin, Ethereum, or Litecoin.  After verifying the account, the investor can add a number of payment methods including credit or debit cards, U.S. bank accounts, or even wire transfers of funds.  Cryptocurrency transactions are not anonymous and the identify of the currency owner can be traced back to a real-world identity.

As a cryptocurrency, bitcoin is generated through the process of “mining”—essentially using your computer’s processing power to solve complex algorithms called “blocks.”  One can buy and sell bitcoin on an exchange, much like a physical currency exchange, converting wealth from bitcoin to US dollars to other national currencies, back to dollars or bitcoin. And that’s how money is made.

Tax Treatment Of Cryptocurrencies Creating Opportunities For IRA InvestorsEven though bitcoin is labeled as a “cryptocurrency”, from a federal income tax standpoint, bitcoin and other cryptocurrency are not considered a “currency”.  On March 25, 2014, the IRS issued Notice 2014-21, which, for the first time, set forth the IRS position on the taxation of virtual currencies, such as bitcoin.  According to the IRS Notice, “Virtual currency is treated as property for U.S. federal tax purposes.” The Notice further stated “General tax principles that apply to property transactions apply to transactions using virtual currency.”  In other words, the IRS is treating the income or gains from the sale of a virtual currency, such as bitcoin, as a capital asset, subject to either short-term (ordinary income tax rates) or long term capital gains tax rates, if the asset is held greater than twelve months (15% or 20% tax rates based on income).  By treating bitcoins and other virtual currencies as property and not currency, the IRS is imposing extensive record-keeping rules—and significant taxes—on its use.

The IRS tax treatment of virtual currency has created a favorable tax environment for Self-Directed IRA investors.  In general, when a retirement account generates income or gains from the purchase and sale of a capital asset, such as stocks, mutual funds, real estate, etc., irrespective of whether the gain was short-term (held less than twelve months) or long-term (held greater than twelve months), the retirement account does not pay any tax on the transaction and any tax would be deferred to the future when the retirement account holder takes a distribution (in the case of a Roth IRA no tax would be due if the distribution is qualified).  Hence, using retirement funds to invest in cryptocurrencies, such as bitcoin, could allow the investor to defer or even eliminate in the case of a Roth, any tax due from the investment.  Note – retirement account investors interested in mining bitcoins versus trading, could become subject to the unrelated business taxable income tax rules if the “mining” constituted a trade or business.

As I mentioned earlier, cryptocurrency investments, such as bitcoin, are risky and highly volatile.  Any investor interested in learning more about bitcoin should do their due diligence and proceed with caution.

For more information about using your IRA to invest in cryptocurrencies, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

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May 23

How Does the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Structure Work?

Making an investment through a Self-Directed IRA LLC can be done in a few easy steps:

1. Set up a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC.

With IRA Financial Group, you no longer have to spend $2000 to $5,000 or more to set up your Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC.

We provide the following all for one low price

  • Free tax consultation with our in-house retirement tax professionals
  • Setup your LLC in the State of your choice
  • Prepare and file the Articles of Organization with the State
  • Generate a special purpose, attorney-reviewed Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Operating Agreement
  • Generate a special purpose, attorney-reviewed Subscription Agreement, as required by the Custodian
  • Obtain the EIN from the IRS
  • Co-ordinate setup with the Custodian of your Choice
  • Free tax and IRA support regarding the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Structure
  • Expedited Service Guarantee!
  • Satisfaction Guaranteed!

How Does the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC Structure Work?

The IRA Financial Group will take care of the entire setup of your Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 7-21 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the state of formation and the custodian holding your retirement funds. Our IRA experts and tax and ERISA professionals are onsite greatly reducing the setup time and cost. Most importantly, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned a retirement tax professionals to help with the establishment of the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

2. Transfer of Retirement Funds Tax-Free.

Our IRA Experts will assist you in transferring your retirement funds tax-free from your current custodian to a new FDIC backed/IRS approved Passive Custodian that allows for truly Self-Directed IRA investments, such as real estate, tax liens, precious metals, and much, much more.

What is a Passive Custodian?

The IRS approved and FDIC backed custodian in the “checkbook control” Self-Directed IRA LLC structure is referred to as a “passive” custodian largely because the custodian is not required to approve any IRA related investment and simply serves the passive role of satisfying IRS regulations. The passive custodian business model is built around the establishment and maintenance of IRAs, whereas a traditional IRA custodian generates income through the marketing and sale of investment products.

All the passive custodians we work with are FDIC backed and IRS approved. Once your custodian has transferred your retirement funds to the passive custodian, the passive custodian will immediately transfer your funds to your new IRA LLC where you as manager of the LLC will have “Checkbook Control” over the funds.

With a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC with “checkbook control” you no longer have to pay excessive custodian fees based on account value and transaction fees. Instead, with a “checkbook control” Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, an FDIC backed IRS approved passive custodian is used. By using a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC with “checkbook control” you can take advantage of all the benefits of self-directing your retirement assets without incurring excessive custodian fees and custodian created delays.

Our IRA Experts will assist you in completing all the necessary custodian documents so your retirement funds are transferred to the new passive custodian quickly and without any tax.

3. Open IRA LLC Bank Account.

Open a local bank account for the LLC at any bank of your choice. You can open a bank account for your Self-Directed IRA LLC at any bank or credit union.

4. Tax-Free Transfer of Funds to LLC Bank Account.

Direct the passive custodian to transfer the IRA funds to your new Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC bank account. The IRA LLC checking account can be opened at any bank or credit union.

5. “Checkbook Control”.

As the Manager of the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, you will have the freedom to make all investment decisions for your Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC. In other words, you will have “checkbook control” over your IRA funds allowing you to make an IRA investment by simply writing a check or wiring funds directly from the IRA LLC bank account.

6. Tax-Free Investing.

Since your IRA will become the owner(s) (member(s)) of the newly formed IRA LLC, all income and gains generated by an IRA LLC investment will generally flow back to your IRA tax-free. With a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, all income and gains associated with the Roth IRA investment grow tax-free and will not be subject to tax upon withdrawal or distribution. This is because unlike traditional IRAs, you are generally not subject to any tax upon taking Roth IRA distributions once you reach the age of 59 1/2.

Because an LLC is treated as a passthrough entity for federal income tax purposes, all income and gains are taxed at the owner level not at the entity level. However, since an IRA is a tax-exempt party pursuant to Internal Revenue Code Section 408 and, thus, does not pay federal income tax, all IRA investment income and gains will generally flow through to the IRA tax-free!

The IRA Financial Group will take care of the entire setup of your Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. The whole process can be handled by phone, email, fax, or mail and typically takes between 7-21 days to complete, the timing largely depending on the state of formation and the custodian holding your retirement funds. Our IRA experts and tax and ERISA professionals are onsite greatly reducing the setup time and cost. Most importantly, each client of the IRA Financial Group is assigned a retirement tax professionals to help with the establishment of the Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC “Checkbook Control” structure. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Self-Directed IRA LLC Structure

Self Directed IRA LLC

For more information about the Self-Directed Roth IRA Structure, please contact us @ 800.472.0646 today!

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May 03

Using Your Self Directed IRA to Invest in Tax Liens

It’s a little-known fact that tax liens can be purchased with retirement account funds. By Self-Directing your IRA LLC  investments into tax liens, your profits are tax-deferred back into your retirement account. More importantly, if you have full checkbook control over your Self-Directed IRA, the purchases can be made on the spot as fast as you can write a check. Tax Liens have been a lesser known and underappreciated money-maker, however learning how they can magnify your earnings in a tax-deferred IRA LLC will make them one of the soundest investments in your retirement account.

The purchase of tax lien certificates is a surprisingly safe investment. The transaction is fast and its characteristics make tax liens a perfect investment for the individual with full checkbook control of an IRA Financial Group IRA LLC. In fact, the use of a Self-Directed IRA LLC is one of the most tax efficient ways to finance your tax lien purchase. IRA Financial Group’s IRA LLC allows investors to participate in a wide range of investment vehicles including, but not limited to tax liens, real estate, mortgages, franchise, notes, stocks and mutual funds, partnerships, etc.

These unique IRS approved structures are created by IRA Financial Group’s in-house tax and ERISA professionals who personally customize your account structure to suit your needs. Only a handful of institutions are skilled in these specialized account structures and IRA Financial Group is the “gold standard” for Compliance, Leadership, Customer Service, and Technological Innovation.

Facts & Opportunities Surrounding Tax Liens

Real estate has long been considered one of the best (and safest) investment opportunities for both the large and small capitalist. Savvy investors know that the trick to making money in a downward spiraling market is to purchase properties for a fraction of their value. The question is…How? Many are finding the perfect answer in the high-profit possibilities of investing in Tax Lien Sales.

How to Buy Tax Liens with a Self Directed IRAWhen a property owner falls behind on their taxes, failing to pay for one or more years, the local taxing authority has the legal right to place a lien or repossess the property and sell it at auction to recoup the lost tax revenue. How long local authorities wait to seize individual properties, and how much they allow to be owed on it before one of these events is up to the lien laws in their particular area. In many cases properties may be acquired for a few thousand dollars, regardless of how much it’s actually worth! Similarly, paying off the lien on others may cost more than the house or land is worth. A savvy investor takes the time to research each property carefully prior to sale day.

Tax Lien Sales

Tax lien sales usually happen at public auctions once or twice a year, depending on the area in which it is located, and how many properties the government may seize annually for back taxes. Larger urban areas may hold monthly auctions, while smaller rural ones might only have one a year.

Types of Tax Liens

There are two types of tax lien sales through auction: the tax lien certificate; and the tax lien deed. Both can be a safe yet profitable opportunity for investors with check book control.

Tax Lien Certificate sales offer the delinquent homeowner one last chance to retain ownership of their property, by using third-party investment money to pay off the taxes and give them a bit more time to collect the money needed to pay their debt without the risk of losing their home. When an investor bids on a tax lien certificate, he is in essence agreeing to loan the homeowner the money needed to pay all taxes due. The homeowner, in turn, agrees to pay back the tax lien certificate holder – with interest – by a specified date. If the homeowner fails to pay the debt on time, the deed to the property is transferred to the investor for the amount paid on the taxes. Either way the investor makes a profit: either on the interest he earns on the loan; or by obtaining the property for a fraction of its value through the tax lien sale, and then reselling it.

Tax Lien Deed sales are handled a bit differently, since the investor is actually bidding (or buying), the complete property at the time of auction, with no responsibility to give the homeowner more time to pay his/her tax debt. Once the selling price is approved, the deed is automatically transferred to its new owner, giving the investor full reign as to what to do with the property next: renovate it; sell it as-is; or raze the existing house and build anew.

Investors usually pay more for properties in this type of tax lien sale, which may lower their profit margins compared to the acquisition of tax lien certificate properties. But, many investors prefer outright purchases to eliminate problems with current homeowners. Either way, investing in tax liens is a profitable and easy way to enter the real estate market in virtually any area.

How Much Money Can I Make and How?

1. Double Your Money Quickly. A Self-Directed IRA LLC can be supercharged when you buy tax lien certificates. Example: A tax lien certificate can earn up to 16% annually in your Self-Directed IRA. When you buy tax lien investments you generally receive the amount invested plus interest within 12 months. If you continue to reinvest in tax liens year after year at 16%, you can double your money in about 4.4 years. Only a Self-Directed IRA LLC can preserve this 16% return, as traditional IRAs do not invest in tax liens.

2. Your Money Grows Tax-Free. By buying tax liens in an IRA Financial Group Self-Directed IRA LLC, you can avoid all taxes until the money invested is withdrawn from the IRA, which is usually around age 59 1/2. The money can be invested once, twice or a thousand times and continue to grow tax-free, so long as it is not withdrawn for personal use. If you use a Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC, your investment will grow tax-free and you can withdraw the funds tax-free once you reach the age of 59 1/2.

3. The Flexibility to Buy Time Sensitive Investments. IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed IRA LLC allows you to carry a checkbook that is tied to the account. In this arrangement, you can buy tax liens with the stroke of the pen, without a custodian or other bureaucrat saying no or otherwise trying to slow down the process.

Tax liens are backed and leveraged by real estate and guaranteed by the governmental taxing authority. In most states, they are a first lien on real estate, and when foreclosed, they wipe out all junior liens, including mortgages. This allows you to potentially receive a valuable piece of real estate for pennies on the dollar!

Time to Act

Real property has been the cornerstone of wealth for thousands of years. While ill-informed speculators have fled real estate because of the housing bust, intelligent real estate investors are enjoying immense profits by expanding their geographic scope and investing for predictable income.

Establish a Self-Directed IRA LLC with IRA Financial Group and have immediate “checkbook control” to make tax lien investments.

Our in-house tax and ERISA professionals will take care of setting up your Self-Directed IRA LLC. Our tax and ERISA professionals are onsite greatly reducing the setup time and cost. You will find that our fee for this service is significantly less than other companies that perform the same or similar services.

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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