Dec 20

When Do I need to take My Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) From My IRA?

The terms of an independent retirement account or annuity must include several minimum distribution rules, which Congress imposed to ensure that IRAs are primarily used as retirement savings media, not as vehicles to build wealth for transmission to heirs. As discussed below, these rules provide separately for distributions to IRA owners and distributions to beneficiaries after the death of an IRA owner. An IRA owner is an individual who establishes and contributes to an IRA for the benefit of himself or herself and his or her beneficiaries.

When Do I need to take My Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) From My IRA?Minimum distributions to IRA owners

An IRA must, by its terms, require the account or annuity to be fully distributed not later than April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the IRA owner attains age 70 and 1/2 or be distributed by annual or more frequent payments over a period beginning by that date and continuing not longer than for the owner’s life, the lives of the owner and his or her beneficiary, or a period not longer than the life expectancy of the owner or the owner and beneficiary. April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the owner reaches age 70 and 1/2 is the required beginning date.

How are minimum distribution requirements satisfied in the case of multiple Traditional IRAs?

Minimum distributions must be determined separately for each IRA. If an individual is owner of more than one IRA, however, the sum of the minimum distributions from all of them may be satisfied by distributions from any of them. This aggregation rule generally applies only to IRA owners. It does not allow an IRA held as beneficiary to be combined with other IRAs, whether held as owner or as beneficiary. However, two or more IRAs held as beneficiary of the same decedent may be aggregated if minimum distributions are being determined under the same life expectancy rule. IRA distributions cannot satisfy distributions under Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contracts and vice versa. Also, distributions from Roth IRAs cannot satisfy minimum distribution obligations under a traditional IRA or an Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contract.

What do I need to report when making a minimum IRA distribution?

Trustees, custodians, and issuers of IRAs (trustees) must make reports on minimum distributions to IRA owners and the IRS. If a minimum IRA distribution is required for a calendar year as of the beginning of which the IRA owner (or a surviving spouse who has elected to be treated as owner) is alive, the trustee holding the IRA as of December 31 of the preceding year must provide a statement to the owner by January 31 of the distribution year. The statement must indicate that a minimum distribution is required for the year, state the date by which the distribution must be made, and either state the amount of the distribution (calculated assuming that the sole beneficiary of the IRA is not a spouse more than 10 years younger than the IRA owner) or offer to compute the amount. The statement must also inform the owner that this information will be provided to the IRS. A trustee must also file Form 5498 (IRA Contribution Information) with the IRS for each calendar year for which a minimum distribution is required. This form need not state the amount of the minimum distribution.

No reporting to beneficiaries or the IRS is required with respect to IRAs of deceased owners. Also, although the minimum distribution rules for IRAs generally apply to Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contracts, no reporting is required with respect to such a contract, whether the employee is living or dead.

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 26

Here’s What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits

Last week, the IRS announced the new limits for retirement plans for 2018.  Here’s what you need to know about your IRA Contributions –

2018 IRA (including Self-Directed IRAs) Contribution Limit – Limits remain the same as 2017.  For individuals under age 50, the limit is $5,500.  For those 50 and older, you can make an additional $1,000 catch-up contribution, bringing the total limit to $6,500.

Here's What You Need to Know About the 2018 IRA Contribution Limits2018 Deductible IRA Phase-outs – If you participate in en employer-sponsored plan (such as a 401(k) plan), there are income restrictions for a deduction.  If you are single or head-of-household, you can get a full deduction if your adjusted gross income (AGI) is $63,000 or less.  It phases out until an AGI of $73,000.  An AGI above that means you cannot deduct your IRA contribution for the year.  If you are married filing jointly, you receive a full deduction if your AGI is $101,000 or less.  This phases out until an AGI of $121,000.  If you are married filing jointly and your spouse participates in an employer’s plan, the phase-out starts at $189,000 and you are not eligible for a deduction if your AGI is above $199,000.

2018 Roth IRA (including Self-Directed Roth IRAs) Contribution Limit – Again, these are the same as last year (and the same amount as traditional plans).  $5,500 if you are under age 50 and $6,500 if you are age 50+.

2018 Roth IRA Income Limits – You may only contribute directly to a Roth IRA if you are below the income limits.  If you are single or head-of-household, you may make a full contribution if your AGI is less than $120,000.  Your contribution limit phases out until $135,000, in which you may not contribute to a Roth directly.  If you are married filing jointly, an AGI of less than $189,000 allows for a full contribution.  This amount phases out until it reaches $199,000.

Note: You must have earned income in the year(s) in which you wish to contribute to an IRA.  The amount you may contribute is the lesser of the annual limit or your earned income for the year.

SEP IRA – Contribution limit increases $1,000 to $55,000 for 2018.

SIMPLE IRA – The limit remains the same as 2017 at $12,500 with a $3,000 catch-up for those age 50 and up.

For more information about the IRA Contribution limits, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 17

What are the minimum distribution requirements of an IRA?

The terms of an independent retirement account or annuity must include several minimum distribution rules, which Congress imposed to ensure that IRAs are primarily used as retirement savings media, not as vehicles to build wealth for transmission to heirs. As discussed below, these rules provide separately for distributions to IRA owners and distributions to beneficiaries after the death of an IRA owner. An IRA owner is an individual who establishes and contributes to an IRA for the benefit of himself or herself and his or her beneficiaries.

What are the minimum distribution requirements of an IRA?Minimum distributions to IRA owners

An IRA must, by its terms, require the account or annuity to be fully distributed not later than April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the IRA owner attains age 70 and 1/2 or be distributed by annual or more frequent payments over a period beginning by that date and continuing not longer than for the owner’s life, the lives of the owner and his or her beneficiary, or a period not longer than the life expectancy of the owner or the owner and beneficiary. April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the owner reaches age 70 and 1/2 is the required beginning date.

Note: there are no required minimum distributions for a Roth IRA

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Oct 10

New Podcast – The Trump Tax Plan and Your Retirement Account

IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman discusses the new tax plan announced by President Trump and the implications it has for retirement account holders.

 

IRAFG Logo Small

Click Here to Listen

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Aug 30

Why Use IRA Funds with ROBS to Fund a Business

When it comes to using IRA funds to buy or finance a business that you or another “disqualified person” will be involved in personally, there is only one legal way to do it and that is through the Business Acquisition Solution, also known as a Rollover Business Start-Up (ROBS). The ROBS solution takes advantage of an exception in the tax code under Internal Revenue Code (“IRC”) Section 4975(d) that allows one to use 401(k) plan funds to buy stock in a “C” Corporation, which is known as “qualifying employer securities”. The exception to the IRS prohibited transaction rules found in IRC 4975(d) requires that a 401(k) plan buy “qualifying employer securities”, which is defined as stock of a “C” Corporation. This is the reason why one cannot use a self-directed IRA LLC to invest in a business the IRA holder or a disqualified person will be personally involved in or why a 401(k) plan cannot invest in an LLC in which the plan participant or disqualified person will be involved in without triggering the prohibited transaction rules.

So How Does the ROBS Solution Work?

The structure typically involves the following sequential steps:

1. An entrepreneur or existing business owner establishes a new C Corporation;

2. The C Corporation adopts a prototype 401(k) plan that specifically permits plan participants to direct the investment of their plan accounts into a selection of investment options, including employer stock, also known as “qualifying employer securities.”

3. The entrepreneur elects to participate in the new 401(k) plan and, as permitted by the plan, directs a rollover or trustee-to-trustee transfer of retirement funds from another qualified retirement plan into the newly adopted 401(k) plan;

4. The entrepreneur then directs the investment of his or her 401(k) plan account to purchase the C Corporation’s newly issued stock at fair market value ( i.e., the amount that the entrepreneur wishes to invest in the new business); and finally

5.The C Corporation utilizes the proceeds from the sale of stock to purchase an existing business or to begin a new venture.

What Are Some of the Advantages of the ROBS Solution?

  • Save Money: The primary advantage of establishing a ROBS solution is to be able to use your retirement funds to invest in a business you will be personally involved in without having to pay tax the retirement funds you wish to use as a distribution to tax and potentially penalty. By being able to invest the retirement funds into the business without having to take a taxable distribution and a 10% early distribution penalty if under the age of 591/2, using a ROBS solution could save someone close to 45% of the distribution amount. For example, if someone under the age of 591/2 was looking to use $100,000 of retirement funds to fund a business and ended up taking a taxable distribution of that amount, that individual would likely have to pay approximately 45% of the 100,000 or $45,000 in tax to the IRS when declaring the distribution on their tax return. The tax rate could be lower if the individual was in a lower income tax bracket or the retirement funds needed were insignificant, but using a ROBS solution would save having to pay tax and potentially a 10% penalty on that amount.
  • Invest in Yourself: The ROBS solution allows one to invest their retirement funds in a business that will be actively run by the retirement account holder. As a result, one is essentially investing their retirement funds in themselves rather than on Wall Street. Of course, not all businesses are successful. According to Bloomberg, close to 80% of new businesses fail in the first 18 months. Hence, investing your hard earned retirement funds in a new business is certainly a risk. However, it is a risk that you are legally entitled to take as per the Internal Revenue Code. Using retirement funds to invest in your business is not for everyone, but for those entrepreneurs that would rather invest in themselves than Wall Street, the ROBS solution is an option.
  • Diversification: There is a growing sentiment among financial advisors, especially after the 2008 financial crisis, that in order to protect your retirement funds from a market downturn, your retirement funds should be well diversified. One can generally not eliminate investment risk completely, but one can manage your level of risk. Every investment has some amount of risk, however, having your retirement funds invested in different types of investments, such as stocks, real estate, and even private businesses, can be a way of diversifying your retirement portfolio and better protecting your retirement funds. Also, it is believed that diversification can enable a retirement portfolio to grow both when markets boom and returns crumble in one sector One should certainly work with a financial planner and tax professional when looking at investment options, especially when it comes to using retirement funds to buy a business.
  • Earn a Salary: In order for one to be a participant of a 401(k) Plan, one needs to be an employee of the business, which adopted the plan. This is the reason why if you own Apple or IBM stock but don’t work at those companies, you cannot participate in their company 401(k) plans. Hence, in order to be eligible to participate in the corporation 401(k) plan you must become a W-2 employee of the C Corporation. For many entrepreneurs the ability to earn a salary and be actively involved in the business is the reason they are using a ROBS solution versus using a self-directed IRA.
  • Benefit from having a 401(k) Retirement Plan: One of the best ways for you to save toward your own retirement and ensure your future security is through an employer-sponsored 401(k) plan. Below are some of the advantages of offering and participating ion a 401(k) Plan.
  • Matching Contributions Many employers will match a portion of your savings: It’s like passing up free money if you don’t participate. A safe harbor 401(k) Plan, which is a popular type of 401(k) plan for small businesses, offer employees who participate in the plan a 3% matching contribution made by the employer. Thus, for example, if the employee earns $40,000 in salary during the year and contributes 3% of the salary of $1200 to the 401(k) plan, the employer would contribute an additional $1200 (3% of the salary) to the individual 401(k) plan account.
  • Retaining employees: with most businesses offering their employees retirement benefits, it is worthwhile for small businesses to compete for talented workers by implementing 401(k) benefits. Offering 401(k) plan benefits is a great way to retain key employees. In general, when potential hires are considering multiple job offers, they’ll compare those offers based on corporate culture, growth opportunities, and benefits packages. –
  • Easy Administration: 401(k) Plan administration is now easier and more cost-effective than ever with Internet options available to small employers. In addition, IRA Financial Group offers recordkeeping and third-party administration services for your plan allowing you to spend more time focusing on your business and less on your plan.
  • You Can Participate As Well: You are eligible to participate in the company 401(k) plan if you are an owner or an employee of the company that sponsor’s the 401(k) plan. Current regulations allow plan participants to contribute up to $18,000 ($24,000 if over the age of 50) of their income on a pre-tax basis each year. That means that in addition to your tax savings for offering the plan and providing matching contributions, you’ll receive yet another tax savings for participating in the plan. This savings can be substantial – an owner in the 35% tax bracket who made the maximum contribution would have saved approximately $6,500 in taxes in 2017.

To learn more about the benefits of the ROBS strategy, please contact a retirement tax expert at 800-472-0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Aug 24

New Podcast – IRA Hardship Distributions

IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman discusses how you can take a hardship distribution withdrawal from your IRA and what taxes and penalties may or may not apply.

 

IRAFG Logo Small

Click Here to Listen

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Jul 26

What The Law Says About Unrelated Business Taxable Income In Non-Real Estate Investments

The following was written by our own Adam Bergman and appeared on Forbes.com

For many retirement account investors, understanding how the Unrelated Business Taxable Income Rules work, also known as UBTI, UBIT, or debt-financed income rules, and how they may potentially apply to one’s retirement account investment has been a challenge.  The main reason is that the majority of IRA or 401(k) plan investors invest in traditional types of investments, such as equities, mutual funds, and ETFs, which do not trigger the application of the UBTI tax rules since most passive investments that a retirement account might invest in are exempt from the UBTI rules, such as interest, dividends, and capital gains.

Understanding the potential impact of the UBTI rules is crucial for retirement account investors seeking to make non-real estate alternative investments in their retirement accounts, including options, stock short sales, and commodity futures contracts.  In general, the UBTI tax rules are triggered in three instances: (i) use of margin to buy stock, (ii) use of a nonrecourse loan to buy real estate, and (iii) investment in a business operated through a flow-through entity, such as an LLC or partnership.  The tax imposed by triggering the UBTI rules is quite steep and can go as high as 40 percent.

When it comes to non-real estate transactions, such as securities and other financial products involving retirement funds, understanding the application of the UBTI or debt-financed income rules have been somewhat difficult. Neither the Code nor the Treasury regulations define “indebtedness” for purposes of the debt-financed income rules. Generally, when a retirement account borrows funds and has a clear obligation to repay the funds, the debt-financed income rules are applicable. However, many financial product type investments that involve “leverage” but not a direct borrowing are not considered debt-financed property and are not subject to UBIT.

Below is a summary of how the UBTI/debt-financed income rules apply to some of the more common type of financial product investments involving retirement funds:

Purchase of Stock or Securities on Margin:  It is well established that the purchase of securities on margin gives rise to unrelated debt-financed income (Elliott Knitwear Profit Sharing Plan v. Commissioner, 614 F.2d 347 (3d Cir. 1980).

Repurchase Agreements:  In a repurchase agreement, one party (usually a bank) purchases securities from another party (the bank’s customer) and agrees to sell the securities back to the customer at an agreed price. Such transactions are treated as a loan of money secured by the securities and give rise to unrelated debt financed income (Rev. Rul. 74-27, 1974-1)

Securities Lending Transactions: IRC Section 514(c)(8) provides that payments with respect to securities loans are deemed to be derived from the securities loaned, not from collateral security or the investment of collateral security from such loans.

Short Sales of Stock: The IRS has ruled that neither the gain attributable to the decline in the price of the stock sold short nor the income earned on the proceeds of the short sale held as collateral by the broker constituted debt-financed income (Rev. Rul. 95-8, 1995-1)

Options: IRC Section 512(b)(5) excludes from UBTI all gains or losses recognized, in connection with an organization’s investment activities, from the lapse or termination of options to buy or sell securities.

Commodities Futures Transactions: The IRS has concluded that gains and losses from commodity futures contracts are excluded from UBTI under Code section 512(b)(5). The IRS has rules that the purchase of a long futures contract entailed no borrowing of money in the traditional sense.  Likewise, the IRS found a short contract was merely an executory contract because there was no property held by the short seller that produced income and thus there could be no acquisition indebtedness.

Notional Principal Contracts: The IRS has issued regulations providing that all income and gain from notional principal contracts is excluded from UBTI. (Treas. Reg. § 1.512(b)-1(a)(1).)

The Internal Revenue Code permits retirement account investors to make a wide range of financial product investments using retirement funds. While the majority of financial product type investments would not trigger the UBTI or debt-financed income rules, (including mutual funds and options) transactions involving margin, however, would likely trigger the tax.  The burden falls on the retirement account holder to make the determination of whether the financial product type transaction triggered the UBTI rules and, if so, file the IRS Form 990-T. Therefore, it is important to work with a tax professional who can help one evaluate the financial product transaction to determine whether the transaction will trigger the UBTI or debt-financed income rules tax.

For more information about the UBTI rules, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Apr 23

Retirement And Educational Savings Tax Planning Tips To Lower Taxes In 2017

Here’s another article written by Adam Bergman for Forbes.com

Now that the tax filing deadline has passed for the 2016 tax year, this is a perfect time to start thinking about some simple ways to boost retirement savings and at the same time lower overall tax liability for 2017.

Start Thinking IRA: For 2017, the maximum IRA contribution is $5,500, or $6,500 if you are over the age of fifty. Contributions can generally be made in pre-tax, after-tax, or Roth.  A pre-tax IRA, also known as a traditional IRA, is one of the more popular ways to save for retirement that also offers tax advantages. Contributions made to a traditional IRA may be fully or partially deductible, depending on your circumstances, and, generally, amounts in a traditional IRA (including earnings and gains) are not taxed until distributed, which is not required until one reaches the age of 70 1/2.

Retirement And Educational Savings Tax Planning Tips To Lower Taxes In 2017An after-tax IRA, also known as a non-deductible IRA, is a traditional IRA that contains nondeductible contributions. Nondeductible contributions to traditional IRAs often occur when one makes too much to make a deductible contribution, or is limited because of employer 401(k) plan contributions. When one takes a distribution from an after-tax IRA, the portion of the distribution coming from nondeductible contributions is tax-free, although, any income and earnings generated from that after-tax contribution would be subject to tax, and a 10% early distribution penalty if the individual is under the age of 59 1/2.

A Roth IRA is an improved version of the after-tax nondeductible IRA.  Although one does not benefit from a tax deduction for contributions, all of the qualified distributions, including earnings, come out tax-free. To contribute to a Roth IRA, ones modified adjusted gross income must fall below the annual limits for your filing status (which is $196,000 if filing jointly for 2017). One can withdraw contributions any time, but must be 59 1/2 years old and you must have had a Roth IRA open for at least five tax years before one can withdraw income and gains without tax or penalty.

Business Owners Rejoice:  Owning a business in 2017 can have some significant retirement tax benefits, if one is aware of them. The scope of the benefits is somewhat dependent on whether the business has full-time employees other than the owners.  For example, a sole proprietor or a business entity with no full-time employees, may be eligible to contribute up to $54,000 ($60,000 if the participant is over the age of fifty), to a solo 401(k) plan in pre-tax, after-tax or Roth.  Whereas, if the business has non-owner full-time employees, the business owner’s total contribution may be limited due to the cost of offering maximum employer profit sharing contributions to all employees.  Nevertheless, business owners should consult with their tax advisor to examine how establishing an employer retirement plan, such as a 401(k) plan, SEP or SIMPLE IRA for their business could potentially help their retirement savings, as well as reduce their annual tax liability.

Get to Know the 529 Plan.  A 529 Plan is an education savings plan operated by a state or educational institution designed to help families set aside funds for future college costs. It is named after Section 529 of the Internal Revenue Code. Nearly every state now has at least one 529 plan available, but the plan characteristics may differ by state.   529 plans are usually categorized as either prepaid or savings plans. In general, the tax advantages of establishing and funding a 529 plan is that earnings are not subject to federal tax and generally not subject to state tax when used for the qualified education expenses of the designated beneficiary, such as tuition, fees, books, as well as room and board. Contributions to a 529 plan, however, are not deductible. One may make a contribution of $14,000 a year or less to a 529 plan qualifies for the annual federal gift tax exclusion. Under special rules unique to 529 plans, one can gift a lump sum of up to $70,000 ($140,000 for joint gifts) and avoid federal gift tax, provided one makes an election to spread the gift evenly over five years Thus, establishing and funding a 529 plan may will not offer you an immediate tax deduction, but it will allow you to help your children afford college by having the contributions and earnings grow without tax over time, thereby, potentially allowing one to spend their retirement savings on other expenses.

HSA Triple Tax Benefit: IRC Section 223 allows individuals who are covered by a compatible health plan, often referred to as a High Deductible Health Plan (HDHP), to set aside funds on a tax-free basis up to the contribution limit to pay for certain out-of-pocket medical expenses. Health Savings Accounts have a triple tax benefit—funds go into the account tax-free, funds grow tax-free and remain completely tax-free when used for eligible medical expenses.  The IRS imposes certain requirements in order to be eligible to contribute to an HSA, such as one cannot be covered by Medicare.  The maximum 2017 contribution is $6750 for families, with a $1000 catch-up for individuals over the age of fifty-five.

Planning and saving for retirement does not have to be painful.  Understanding the rules and employing a consistent approach can help increase retirement savings while simultaneously reducing ones tax liability. However, a few simple retirement planning moves can help make the difference when April 17, 2018 rolls around.

For more information, please contact an IRA Expert @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page

Mar 23

Tax Filing Tips To Save On Taxes And Boost IRA Savings

The following was written by Adam Bergman and first appeared on Forbes.com

With the individual tax-filing deadline date of April 18, 2017 for the 2016 taxable year quickly approaching, reviewing some of the ways one can save taxes as well as boost his or her retirement savings is always helpful.  Below are a few ways one can use the IRA contribution regime to help save taxes as well as enhance one’s retirement nest egg.

Tax Filing Tips To Save On Taxes And Boost IRA Savings

Still Time to Make IRA Contributions for 2016: The maximum IRA contribution is $5500 or $6500 if over the age of fifty and will remain the same for 2017 contributions. The deadline for making IRA or Roth IRA contributions for 2016 is April 18, 2017.  The contribution must be made by such date even if the taxpayer has filed an extension.  Contributions can be made in pre-tax, after-tax or Roth, if applicable.

Don’t Forget About Spousal IRA Contributions: Many married taxpayers are not aware that if one spouse is not working and the other spouse has earned sufficient income, the working spouse can make IRA contributions for the nonworking spouse.  In general, a nonworking spouse can make a deductible IRA contribution of up to $5,500 for 2016 ($6,500 if age 50 or older as of 12/31/16) as long as the couple files a joint return, and the working spouse has earned income that equals are exceeds the sum of the nonworking spouse’s contribution plus the working spouse’s contribution. However, if the working spouse is covered by a qualified retirement plan (via a job or self-employment), the deductibility of the nonworking spouse’s contribution is subject to phase-out based on joint adjusted gross income.

Be Aware of the Savers Tax Credit: Low- and moderate-income taxpayers are incentivized to save for retirement by becoming eligible to claim the saver’s credit, which can be worth up to $2,000 for individuals and $4,000 for couples. People age 18 and older who are not full-time students or dependents on someone else’s tax return can claim this tax credit until their adjusted gross income exceeds $62,000 for couples in 2016.

Not Too Late for Employer SEP IRA Contributions.  For sole proprietors or small business owners looking to make more substantial IRA contributions than $5500 or $6500, if over the age of 50, the SEP IRA could be your answer.  For 2016, an employer can make contributions to a SEP IRA up to the lessor of 25% (20% if sole proprietor or single member LLC) of the employee’s compensation or $53,000.  The limit increases to $54,000 for 2017.  SEP IRA contributions for the 2016 taxable year can be made by April 18, 2017 or up until the date of the tax filing extension date, if applicable.

Contributing to a pre-tax IRA or qualified retirement plan, such as a 401(k), can prove to be a great way of saving for retirement while at the same time reducing ones tax liability.  The IRA contribution regime was designed by Congress to incentivize Americans to save for retirement by granting a tax-deduction for the pre-tax IRA contribution as well as offering the ability to defer taxes on any IRA income/gains until a future date.  The good news is that there is still plenty of time for taxpayers to take advantage of these benefits.

For more information about IRA contributions, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

IRA Financial Group Facebook pageIRA Financial Group Twitter pageamazon-logoIRA Financial Group Tumblr pageIRA Financial Group Pinterest page