Dec 20

When Do I need to take My Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) From My IRA?

The terms of an independent retirement account or annuity must include several minimum distribution rules, which Congress imposed to ensure that IRAs are primarily used as retirement savings media, not as vehicles to build wealth for transmission to heirs. As discussed below, these rules provide separately for distributions to IRA owners and distributions to beneficiaries after the death of an IRA owner. An IRA owner is an individual who establishes and contributes to an IRA for the benefit of himself or herself and his or her beneficiaries.

When Do I need to take My Required Minimum Distributions (RMD) From My IRA?Minimum distributions to IRA owners

An IRA must, by its terms, require the account or annuity to be fully distributed not later than April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the IRA owner attains age 70 and 1/2 or be distributed by annual or more frequent payments over a period beginning by that date and continuing not longer than for the owner’s life, the lives of the owner and his or her beneficiary, or a period not longer than the life expectancy of the owner or the owner and beneficiary. April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the owner reaches age 70 and 1/2 is the required beginning date.

How are minimum distribution requirements satisfied in the case of multiple Traditional IRAs?

Minimum distributions must be determined separately for each IRA. If an individual is owner of more than one IRA, however, the sum of the minimum distributions from all of them may be satisfied by distributions from any of them. This aggregation rule generally applies only to IRA owners. It does not allow an IRA held as beneficiary to be combined with other IRAs, whether held as owner or as beneficiary. However, two or more IRAs held as beneficiary of the same decedent may be aggregated if minimum distributions are being determined under the same life expectancy rule. IRA distributions cannot satisfy distributions under Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contracts and vice versa. Also, distributions from Roth IRAs cannot satisfy minimum distribution obligations under a traditional IRA or an Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contract.

What do I need to report when making a minimum IRA distribution?

Trustees, custodians, and issuers of IRAs (trustees) must make reports on minimum distributions to IRA owners and the IRS. If a minimum IRA distribution is required for a calendar year as of the beginning of which the IRA owner (or a surviving spouse who has elected to be treated as owner) is alive, the trustee holding the IRA as of December 31 of the preceding year must provide a statement to the owner by January 31 of the distribution year. The statement must indicate that a minimum distribution is required for the year, state the date by which the distribution must be made, and either state the amount of the distribution (calculated assuming that the sole beneficiary of the IRA is not a spouse more than 10 years younger than the IRA owner) or offer to compute the amount. The statement must also inform the owner that this information will be provided to the IRS. A trustee must also file Form 5498 (IRA Contribution Information) with the IRS for each calendar year for which a minimum distribution is required. This form need not state the amount of the minimum distribution.

No reporting to beneficiaries or the IRS is required with respect to IRAs of deceased owners. Also, although the minimum distribution rules for IRAs generally apply to Internal Revenue Code Section 403(b) contracts, no reporting is required with respect to such a contract, whether the employee is living or dead.

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Oct 17

What are the minimum distribution requirements of an IRA?

The terms of an independent retirement account or annuity must include several minimum distribution rules, which Congress imposed to ensure that IRAs are primarily used as retirement savings media, not as vehicles to build wealth for transmission to heirs. As discussed below, these rules provide separately for distributions to IRA owners and distributions to beneficiaries after the death of an IRA owner. An IRA owner is an individual who establishes and contributes to an IRA for the benefit of himself or herself and his or her beneficiaries.

What are the minimum distribution requirements of an IRA?Minimum distributions to IRA owners

An IRA must, by its terms, require the account or annuity to be fully distributed not later than April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the IRA owner attains age 70 and 1/2 or be distributed by annual or more frequent payments over a period beginning by that date and continuing not longer than for the owner’s life, the lives of the owner and his or her beneficiary, or a period not longer than the life expectancy of the owner or the owner and beneficiary. April 1 of the year following the calendar year during which the owner reaches age 70 and 1/2 is the required beginning date.

Note: there are no required minimum distributions for a Roth IRA

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Feb 12

Trump, The Fiduciary Rule And Your IRA

This article originally appeared on Forbes.com, authored by Adam Bergman –

On February 3, 2017, President Trump announced that he will use a memorandum to ask the labor secretary to consider rescinding a rule, better known as the fiduciary rules, set to go into effect in April 2017 that orders retirement advisers, overseeing about $3 trillion in assets, to act in the best interest of their clients.

The fiduciary rule, rolled out by the Obama administration, took many years to develop. The fiduciary rule aimed to protect retirement savers from bad advice and keep more money in their pockets. It also sought to indirectly change the way the industry structures its products and advisor compensation policies.

Trump, The Fiduciary Rule And Your IRAUnder the fiduciary rules, broker-dealers would be required to act in their clients’ best interest rather than encouraging money moves that directly benefit the broker’s bottom line.  Among the requirements in the rule, brokers have to justify the varying compensation they can receive for recommending one investment product over another to a retirement saver. Brokers said that rule makes sales fees on some mutual funds, known as sales loads, and some funds’ differing share-class prices problematic for accounts that charge investors for each transaction made.

Currently, if you work with a financial advisor who is a registered broker, he or she only has to recommend investments that are “roughly suitable” for you. That means if your advisor has the option between two similar mutual funds, but one pays out a higher commission, he or she can put you in that one—even if the other fund has lower fees and would boost your portfolio in the long run. In rescinding the fiduciary rules, the Trump administration wants to keep this system in place, arguing that the fiduciary rule will limit investment choices and burden the industry with unnecessary regulations.  According to The industry’s top lobby group, the Securities Industry and Financial Markets Association estimated the fiduciary rule would cost firms $5 billion to implement and another $1.1 billion annually to maintain.

The Obama Administration believed that fiduciary rules would help lower costs for American retirement account investors as well as better protect the average retirement investor from bad advice and unnecessary fees.  On the flip side, the financial industry has attacked the rules as being overly burdensome as well as potentially limiting the type of investments and advice financial advisors can offer.  To this end, in 2016, Edward Jones and some other financial advisors announced that it would stop offering mutual funds and exchange traded funds in IRA accounts that charge investors a commission and move to an account value fee based arrangement.

In the end, President Trump seemingly sided with the financial and securities industry that the fiduciary rules were overly burdensome and would limit investment options for IRA holders.  In the end, it appears that President Trump was not convinced that any lower consumer costs associated with the enactment of the fiduciary rule would be enough to overcomes its perceived shortfalls. Because the fiduciary rules have not yet been enacted into law, President Trump’s executive order rescinding the rule will have no current impact on IRA investors, however, the long-term impact could be significant for both investors and financial advisors.

For more information about the fiduciary rule, please contact us @ 800.472.0646.

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Nov 17

The Roth IRA May Be Big Winner In 2016 Presidential Election

This article originally appeared on Forbes.com:

With the 2016 presidential election behind us, we can all start thinking about what this country will look like under President Donald Trump.  Notwithstanding all the pre-election campaign rhetoric about immigration, foreign policy, etc., one thing we are quite certain about is that President-Elect Trump is serious about reducing personal income and corporate tax rates across the board.  Both President-Elect Trump and House Speaker Ryan have put forth proposed tax reform plans and lawmakers will likely consider both plans when coming up with future American tax policy.

What we currently know is that both Trump and Ryan promise the lowest tax rate since before World War II and to shrink the personal income tax brackets from seven down to three.  Under the Trump plan, there would be three income tax rate brackets, 12%, 25%, and a top rate of 33%, which is lower than the current highest income tax rate of 39.6%.  Capital gain tax rates will remain much as they are, with a top tax rate of 20% under the Trump plan.  However, the biggest change under the Trump tax plan from the current tax system, is that business income of a taxpayer will be taxed at 15%. Whereas, the Trump and Ryan plan would make it difficult for individuals to benefit from specific deductions, as both plans raise the standard deduction limit.

Overall we should expect that a Trump Presidency will usher in lower personal and business taxes for most Americans.  So what does that mean for your retirement account contributions?  In general, when an individual is deciding to make IRA or pension contributions, such as to an employer 401(k) plan, the biggest question is generally whether contributions should be made in pre-tax or Roth.

A pre-tax IRA or 401(k) plan contribution provides the individual making the contribution with a current income tax deduction for the amount of the contribution, but the retirement account holder would ultimately be liable for income tax on any income taken out of the retirement account, with a 10% early distribution penalty if done prior to the age of 591/2.  Whereas, a Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) plan contribution is made with after-tax funds, meaning there is no immediate income tax deduction when the contribution is made, but if the retirement account holder is able to keep the Roth account opened at least five years and wait until reaching the age of 591/2, all Roth IRA or 401(k) funds can be taken out tax-free.  The Roth IRA does have an income limitation threshold, which is $194,000 for married couples filing jointly, but a backdoor way does exist for those individuals to still make Roth IRA contributions.

When a tax professional helps a client decide between making a pre-tax or Roth IRA or 401(k) plan contribution, one of the primary items the advisor will look at is the financial impact a deduction will have on the taxpayer’s income tax liability. The general thinking goes that if there is less tax to pay then taking a tax deduction would have less of a financial impact than in a higher tax environment, For example, if an individual earns $40,000 in annual income, under the Trump tax plan he or she would be subject to $4800 in taxes, versus a 25% income tax rate in 2016.

Sure, the IRA contribution deduction would be beneficial in reducing any income tax due, but such a deduction would likely have a lower financial impact on the taxpayer than with higher tax rates likely making the Roth contribution a more attractive option for many taxpayers.  The Trump victory and a low tax income policy will likely lead more tax advisors to consider and recommend the Roth IRA or Roth 401(k) contribution over a pre-tax retirement contribution.  Lower tax rates generally means income tax deductions carry less value. Weighing the financial loss of a current income tax deduction versus the super benefit of tax-free growth in a Roth IRA should make Roth contributions the popular choice for more Americans than ever before.

Some people will argue that lower tax rates means that saving money in a tax free retirement account, such as a Roth, will have less value since there would be less tax due on a distribution and the individual would likely be in a lower tax bracket at the retirement age of distribution. This argument ignores the fact that a Trump presidency will likely bring tax rates to historical lows, which for many Americans looking to retire in the next ten or twenty years, will likely mean a future with higher taxes.

It is unclear what type of impact a Trump presidency will have on the country and the entire world, but a Trump tax plan based on lower domestic income tax rates should make Roth contributions the big winner for many U.S. retirement account holders.

For more information about the Roth IRA, please contact an IRA Expert at the IRA Financial Group @ 800.472.0646.

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Nov 14

Rolling Over an IRA

Individuals may generally rollover their retirement savings between eligible defined contribution plans, defined benefit plans and pre-tax IRAs, including SEP IRAs and SIMPLE IRAs to a Self-Directed IRA. Eligible defined contribution plans include qualified 401(k) retirement plans under Internal Revenue Code Section 401(a), 403(a), 403(b), and governmental 457(b) plans. Individuals may also roll over after-tax retirement funds to a Roth Self-Directed IRA.

What is the most Common Way to Fund a Self-Directed IRA?

Transfers and rollovers are types of transactions that allow movements of assets between like IRAs – Traditional IRA to Traditional IRA and Roth IRA to Roth IRA. An IRA transfer is the most common method of funding a Self-Directed IRA LLC or Self-Directed Roth IRA.

IRA Transfers to a Self-Directed IRA

An IRA-to-IRA transfer is one of the most common methods of moving assets from one IRA to another. A transfer usually occurs between two separate financial organizations, but a transfer may also occur between IRAs held at the same organization. If an IRA transfer is handled correctly the transfer is neither taxable nor reportable to the IRS. With an IRA transfer, the IRA holder directs the transfer, but does not actually receive the IRA assets. Instead, the transaction in completed by the distributing and receiving financial institutions. In sum, in order for the IRA transfer to be tax-free and penalty-free, the IRA holder must not receive the IRA funds in a transfer. Rather, the check must be made payable to the new IRA custodian. Also, there is no reporting or withholding to the IRS on an IRA transfer.

The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you fund your Self-Directed IRA LLC by transferring your current pre-tax or after-tax IRA funds to your new Self-Directed IRA or Self-Directed Roth IRA structure tax-free and penalty-free. In order

How the Self-Directed IRA Transfer Works?

Your assigned retirement tax professional will work with you to establish a new Self-Directed IRA account at a new FDIC and IRS approved IRA custodian. The new custodian will then, with your consent, request the transfer of IRA assets from your existing IRA custodian in a tax-free and penalty-free IRA transfer. Once the IRA funds are either transferred by wire or check tax-free to the new IRA custodian, the new custodian will be able to invest the IRA assets into the new IRA LLC “checkbook control” structure. Once the funds have been transferred to the new IRA LLC, you, as manager of the IRA LLC, you would have “checkbook control” over your retirement funds so you can make traditional as well as non-traditional investments tax-free and penalty-free.

Moving 401(k) Plan & Qualified Retirement Plan Assets to a Self-Directed IRA

The 2001 Economic Growth and Tax Relief Reconciliation Act expanded the rollover opportunities between employer-sponsored retirement plans, such as 401(k) Plans and IRAs. Since 2002, individuals may rollover both pre-tax and after-tax 401(k) Plan fund assets from a 401(a), 403(a), 403(b), and governmental 457(b) plans into a Traditional IRA tax-free and penalty-free.

In general, in order to rollover qualified retirement plans to a Traditional IRA there must be a plan-triggering event. A plan-triggering event is typically based on the plan documents, but they generally include the following: (i) the termination of the plan, (ii) the plan participant reaching the age of 591/2, or (iii) the plan participating leaving the employer.

A Direct Rollover to a Self-Directed IRA

A direct rollover transpires when a plan participant, who has access to his or her retirement funds, moves the eligible qualified retirement plan funds to an IRA custodian. In other words, a direct rollover is between a qualified retirement plan and an IRA, whereas, a transfer is between IRA financial institutions. In general, employer 401(k) plan providers must offer the direct rollover option if it is reasonable anticipated that the total amount of eligible rollover distributions to a recipient for the year would be more than $200.

How to Complete a Direct Rollover

Your assigned retirement tax professional will work with you to establish a new Self-Directed IRA account at a new FDIC and IRS approved IRA custodian. With a direct rollover from a defined contribution plan, the plan participant must initiate the direct rollover request. What this means is that the plan participant must request the movement of 401(k) plan funds to the new IRA custodian, not the IRA custodian, like with an IRA transfer. Your assigned retirement tax professional will assist you in completing the direct rollover request form which will allow you to move your 401(k), 403(a), 403(b), 457(b), or defined benefit plan assets to your new IRA account.

A direct rollover may be accomplished by any reasonable means of direct payment to an IRA. Regulations state that the reasonable means may include, wire, mailing check to new IRA custodian, or mailing check made out to new IRA custodian to plan participant.

Reporting a Direct Rollover

When an individual directly rolls over a qualified retirement plan distribution to a Traditional IRA, the employer is generally required to report the distribution on an IRS Form 1099-R, using Code G in Box 7, Direct rollover and rollover contribution. The receiving IRA administrator would them be required to report the amount as a rollover distribution in Box 2 of IRS Form 5498.

Rollover Chart

Click the image below to view the Rollover Chart.

IRA Rollover Chart

An Indirect Rollover to a Self-Directed IRA

An indirect rollover occurs when the IRA assets or qualified retirement plan assets are moved first to the IRA holder or plan participant before they are ultimately sent to an IRA custodian.

60-Day Rollover Rule

An individual generally has sixty (60) days from receipt of the eligible rollover distribution to roll the funds into an IRA. The 60-day period starts the day after the individual receives the distribution. Usually, no exceptions apply to the 60-day time period. However, in cases where the 60-day period expires on a Saturday, Sunday, or legal holiday, the individual may execute the rollover on the following business day.

An individual receiving an eligible rollover distribution may rollover the entire amount received or any portion of the amount received. The amount of the eligible rollover distribution that is not rolled over to an IRA is generally included in the individual’s gross income and could be subject to a 10% early distribution penalty if the individual is under the age of 591/2.

How the 60-Day Rollover Works with a Self-Directed IRA

The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in rolling over your 60-day eligible rollover distribution to a new FDIC and IRS approved IRA custodian. Once the 60-day eligible rollover distribution has been deposited with the new IRA custodian within the 60-day period, the new custodian will be able to invest the IRA assets into the new IRA LLC “checkbook control” structure. Once the funds have been transferred to the new IRA LLC, you, as manager of the IRA LLC, you would have “checkbook control” over your retirement funds so you can make traditional as well as non-traditional investments tax-free and penalty-free.

60-Day Rollover from an Employer Retirement Plan

In general, when a plan participant requests a distribution from an employer qualified retirement plan. IRS rules require the employer to withhold 20% from the amount of the eligible rollover distribution. If an individual receives an eligible rollover distribution and then elects to rollover the assets to an IRA custodian within 60 days, the individual can make up the 20% withheld by the employer retirement plan provider for federal income tax purposes.

Employer sponsored retirement plans are required to withhold at a rate of 20% on all eligible rollover distributions of taxable funds or assets, unless the participants elects to directly rollover the distribution to an IRA or to another eligible retirement plan. In other words, when taking an indirect rollover from an employer qualified retirement plan, the employer is required to withhold 20% of the eligible rollover distribution. The 20% withholding requirements is not applicable for IRA-to-IRA transfers or for direct rollover distributions.

Reporting Indirect Rollovers

When an individual takes a distribution from an employer sponsored retirement plan, such as 401(k) Plan, the employer should make the individual, even if the individual intends to roll the funds over to an IRA. The employer would be required to withhold 20% from the eligible rollover distribution since the funds will be rolled to the plan participant and not directly to the IRA or qualified retirement plan custodian. The employer (payer) would report the indirect distribution on IRS Form 1099-R, using the applicable distribution Code (1,4, or 7). If the funds are deposited with an IRA custodian within 60-days, the receiving IRA custodian would report the rollover assets on the IRS Form 5498 as a rollover contribution in Box 2.

Self-Directed IRA Transfer & Rollover Experts

The retirement tax professionals at the IRA Financial Group will assist you in determining how best to fund your Self-Directed IRA or Self-Directed Roth IRA LLC structure. Whether it’s by IRA transfer or direct or indirect rollover, each client of the IRA Financial Group will work directly with an assigned retirement tax professional to make sure his or her Self-Directed IRA LLC structure is funded in the most tax efficient manner.

To learn more about the Self-Directed IRA transfer or direct or indirect rollover rules, please contact a tax professional at 800-472-0646.

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Nov 08

Can You Rollover Funds from One IRA to Another IRA?

A distribution from an IRA to the individual for whose benefit the account or annuity is maintained is not taxable to the recipient if reinvested within 60 days in another IRA (other than an endowment contract) for the benefit of the same individual. The rule operates on an all-or-nothing basis. The entire amount received from the old IRA must be transferred to the transferee IRA. If anything is held back, the rollover rule does not apply, and everything received from the old IRA, including any amount transferred to another IRA, is treated as a taxable distribution. However, the distribution from the old IRA need not include the taxpayer’s entire interest. An IRA can be split, for example, by rolling a portion of it into a new IRA.

Can You Rollover Funds from One IRA to Another IRA?If property other than money is received from the old IRA, that property, not substitute property of equal value or the cash proceeds of the property’s sale, must be included in the transfer to the new IRA. According to the Tax Court, the rollover contribution must be of cash if the distribution is in cash.

The privilege of rolling over from IRA to IRA may be exercised only once in a 12-month period.

 

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Nov 03

2017 Self-Directed IRA Contribution Limit

IRA Annual Contribution Limits To Remain the Same as 2016

For 2017, the IRA contribution limits will remain the same as 2016.  For individuals under the age of 50, the maximum Self-Directed IRA contribution for 2017 will be $5500, the same of 2016.  For individuals over the age of 50, the maximum Self-Directed IRA contribution for 2017 will be $6500, the same of 2016.

The Self-Directed IRA LLC Solution

A Self-Directed IRA LLC will offer you the ability to make traditional (stocks, mutual funds) as well as non-traditional investments (real estate, precious metals, etc.) tax-free and without custodian consent.  With IRA Financial Group’s Self-Directed IRA LLC, a special purpose limited liability company (“LLC”) is created which is owned 100% by the IRA and managed by you or any third-person. The advantage of using an LLC to make the investment is that an LLC is treated as a passthrough entity for tax purposes, 2017 Self-Directed IRA Contribution Limitmeaning the owner of the LLC would be subject to the tax not the LLC itself. However, as per Internal Revenue Code Section 408, IRAs are exempt from tax. As a result, in most cases, all income and gains generated by the IRA LLC would flow back to the IRA tax-free. In addition, the LLC investment vehicle allows the IRA owner to take more control of his or her retirement funds by keeping the IRA funds at a LLC bank account and not with a far away custodian, offering “checkbook control” and greater flexibility to make investments quick and without delay.

A World of Investment Opportunity

With a Self-Directed IRA LLC, you will be able to invest in almost any type of investment opportunity that you discover, including: domestic or foreign real estate (rentals, foreclosures, raw land, tax liens etc.), private businesses, precious metals (i.e. gold or silver), hard money & peer to peer lending, as well as stock and mutual funds; your only limit is your imagination. The income and gains from these investments will flow back into your IRA tax-free.

No Transaction Fees – Hassle Free IRA Investing

With a Self-Directed IRA structure, you will have the power to act quickly on a potential investment opportunity. When you find an investment that you want to make with your IRA funds, as manager of the LLC, simply write a check or wire the funds straight from your Self-Directed IRA LLC bank account to make the investment.

A Self-Directed IRA LLC structure will help you save a significant amount of money on custodian fees. With a Self-Directed IRA LLC you no longer have to pay excessive custodian fees based on account value and transaction fees. Instead, your IRA funds will be transferred tax-free via a passive custodian to a new LLC bank account where you, as manager of the LLC, can make investments, such as real estate, tax-free and without custodian consent.

Why Work With the IRA Financial Group?

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP. Over the years, we have helped thousands of clients establish IRS compliant Self-Directed IRA LLC solutions. With our work experience at some of the largest law firms in the country, our retirement tax professionals’ tax and IRA knowledge in this area is unmatched.

To learn more about using a “Checkbook Control” Self-Directed IRA LLC to make real estate and other investments without tax, please contact one of our Self-Directed IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Nov 01

IRA Financial Group Sees Increased Demand for Self-Directed IRA in Light of New IRA Fiduciary Rules

Potential reduction in IRA investment options from traditional financial institutions leading to strong interest in self-directed IRA

IRA Financial Group, the market’s leading provider of self-directed IRA plans, has seen a surge in demand from IRA clients looking to establish a self-directed IRA in light of the new IRA fiduciary rules. The Labor Departments new IRA fiduciary rule is aimed at stopping the $17 billion a year the government claims investors waste in exorbitant fees. The idea is that the regulation will stop advisers from putting their own interests in earning high commissions and fees over clients’ interests in obtaining the best investments at the lowest prices. Merrill Lynch as well as many traditional financial institutions is moving to fee-based IRA accounts in order to avoid a provision of the rule known as the best-interest contract exemption (BICE), an exemption of the rule, which would allow brokers to continue selling products under commission if they were to jump through additional compliance hoops. Many of the basic regulations — the best interest standard — will go into effect in April 2017; others won’t be implemented until 2018. “One reason we are seeing a strong demand for self-directed IRA accounts is that fee-based accounts often don’t make economic sense for firms if the accounts have low balances, so many advisers are expected to drop undersized retirement accounts,” stated Adam Bergman, partner with the IRA financial Group. “We have heard from many IRA clients that mentioned that their broker did not want to handle their small IRA account, which helped turn them on to the self-directed IRA option”, added Mr. Bergman. “Additionally, there are concerns from IRA clients that the new fiduciary rules will force advisors to direct IRA accounts away from funds that pay higher broker commissions even if they could end up generating the highest returns for the client”, continued Mr. Bergman

According to Mr. Bergman, with checkbook IRA annual account fees of $180 flat per year and with the average client having around $100,000 in IRA funds, IRA Financial Trust’s self-directed IRA clients are paying less than 0.20% in account value fees.

IRA Financial Group Sees Increased Demand for Self-Directed IRA in Light of New IRA Fiduciary RulesWith IRA Financial Group’s self directed retirement plans, retirement account investors have the ability to make traditional as well as alternative asset investments, such as real estate in a tax-deferred or tax-free basis. In addition, our self-directed Solo 401(k) plan is a perfect retirement and investment platform for any self-employed or small business owner with no full-time employees.

“The IRA Financial Group has built our businesses on that untapped market, offering low-cost alternative asset self-directed IRA options to retirement account holders whose portfolios may not be big enough for traditional firms,” stated Mr. Bergman.

The IRA Financial Group was founded by a group of top law firm tax and ERISA lawyers who have worked at some of the largest law firms in the United States, such as White & Case LLP, Dewey & LeBoeuf LLP, and Thelen LLP.

IRA Financial Trust Company was founded by Adam Bergman, a partner with the IRA Financial Group. The IRA Financial Group, the leading provider of self-directed IRA retirement solutions. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

IRA Financial Group is the market’s leading provider of self-directed IRA LLC and Solo 401(k) plans. IRA Financial Group has helped thousands of clients take back control over their retirement funds while gaining the ability to invest in almost any type of investment, including real estate without custodian consent.

To learn more about the IRA Financial Group please visit our website at http://www.irafinancialgroup.com or call 800-472-0646. To learn more about establishing a self-directed IRA account with the IRA Financial Trust Company please visit http://www.irafinancialtrust.com or call 800-472-1043.

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Oct 25

What Exactly is a Rollover IRA?

To permit tax-free transfers of retirement savings from one type of investment to another, as well as to increase the portability of qualified plan rights for employees moving from one job to another, Congress included a complicated web of rollover provisions in ERISA. These provisions cover transfers from one IRA to another, transfers from qualified pension, profit-sharing, stock bonus, and annuity plans to IRAs, and transfers from IRAs to qualified plans. An IRA may also, under limited circumstances, make a rollover distribution to a health savings account (HSA). In other words, if you receive a distribution from a qualified plan, you might decide to put some or all of the distribution amount into an IRA. The IRA that receives the qualified plan distribution is called a rollover IRA.

What Exactly is a Rollover IRA?

Please contact one of our IRA Experts at 800-472-0646 for more information.

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Oct 20

New Podcast – Why You Need a Special IRA Custodian to Make Self-Directed IRA Investments

IRA Financial Group’s Adam Bergman discusses why it is necessary to have an IRA Custodian for making investments with your Self-Directed IRA.

 

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Click Here to Listen

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